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May 17 • 2012 • AmericanEasyMangoOrangePeachRoseThe World's Best Rosesfloribunda

THE WORLD'S BEST ROSES

EASY DOES IT

Floribunda 2008 3ft-4ft Although this superb rose was bred in the UK it has really taken the USA by storm.

Each year they choose a few roses for their All American Rose Award but in 2010 there was only one winner, so it looks something special.

Quite big for a  floribunda it produces masses of huge intensely ruffled blooms of mango orange suffusing to pink.

The colour is very difficult to describe but peach, mango, pink and orange are all there to make quite a confectionary of colours.

It is even difficult to catch the colour on film but the picture featured is probably the best we can find for the moment.

As you would expect from a rose with such a top award it flowers all season, it is very healthy, plus the bonus of a lovely perfume.

It looks a sure fire winner in the UK

 Bred by Harkness Roses. UK

Gold Standard Rose Trials

The Gold Standard Trials are the result of a joint initiative between professional rose breeders represented by BARB (British Association of Rose Breeders) and NIAB (National Institute of Agricultural Botany). Unlike some rose trials, breeders pay a fee for each rose variety submitted to the Gold Standard trials, independently managed by NIAB at their Cambridge headquarters.

Based on cumulative information from invited independent judges throughout the two year period of the trial, the Gold Standard is awarded to worthy varieties. Health, floriferousness, scent and commercial appeal are all considered key factors. The first trial was planted in 2004 (and judged during 2005 and 2006) with the results confirmed in autumn 2006. The second trial was concluded in autumn 2007 with a further seven roses joining the original ‘magnificent seven’ to give a total of fourteen varieties awarded ‘Gold Standard’ status. The trial that concluded in autumn 2009 produced a further thirteen Gold Standard roses. The completion in 2010 of the latest trial also adds a further thirteen roses to the ‘Gold Standard Hall of Fame’ making a total to date of 51Gold Standard roses. With the trials set to continue no doubt more roses will receive this accolade in the future.

Other rose trials conducted to establish the performance of new, and in some cases established, rose varieties include the International Merit Trials at the Royal National Rose Society in St Albans, the Glasgow International Trials at Tollcross Park, the Pencoed Trials in Wales, the City of Belfast International Rose Trials and, now in its 28th year, the Rose of the Year trials.

The Gold Standard roses can be viewed at Roath Park, Cardiff and at Borde Hill Garden, Haywards Heath, West Sussex.

Details of all our roses are available on our web site. Over 1000 varieties to choose from.

www.countrygardenroses.co.uk

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May 15 • 2012 • BotanyBreedersBritishRoseStandardThe World's Best RosesTrialsgold

The World's Best Roses

Celebration Time

Floribunda Rose

2006  3ft-4ft

This rose has very unusual colouring. It has been described as russet, smokey lavender/orange or red. Whatever the colour it is quite an interesting rose from the USA. Over there it was named 'Cinco de Mayo' and was voted the All American Selection in 2009. It produces masses of colourful blooms in large clusters throughout the season and well into the autumn. The blooms are pretty weather proof and unaffected by rain. Even the foliage is colourful as it starts of red and changes to semi glossy dark green as it matures. The foliage is pretty healthy and also disease resistant. An interesting rose for cutting with a pleasant perfume.

Bred by Tom Carruth. USA

Gold Standard Rose Trials

The Gold Standard Trials are the result of a joint initiative between professional rose breeders represented by BARB (British Association of Rose Breeders) and NIAB (National Institute of Agricultural Botany). Unlike some rose trials, breeders pay a fee for each rose variety submitted to the Gold Standard trials, independently managed by NIAB at their Cambridge headquarters.

Based on cumulative information from invited independent judges throughout the two year period of the trial, the Gold Standard is awarded to worthy varieties. Health, floriferousness, scent and commercial appeal are all considered key factors. The first trial was planted in 2004 (and judged during 2005 and 2006) with the results confirmed in autumn 2006. The second trial was concluded in autumn 2007 with a further seven roses joining the original ‘magnificent seven’ to give a total of fourteen varieties awarded ‘Gold Standard’ status. The trial that concluded in autumn 2009 produced a further thirteen Gold Standard roses. The completion in 2010 of the latest trial also adds a further thirteen roses to the ‘Gold Standard Hall of Fame’ making a total to date of 51Gold Standard roses. With the trials set to continue no doubt more roses will receive this accolade in the future.

Other rose trials conducted to establish the performance of new, and in some cases established, rose varieties include the International Merit Trials at the Royal National Rose Society in St Albans, the Glasgow International Trials at Tollcross Park, the Pencoed Trials in Wales, the City of Belfast International Rose Trials and, now in its 28th year, the Rose of the Year trials.

The Gold Standard roses can be viewed at Roath Park, Cardiff and at Borde Hill Garden, Haywards Heath, West Sussex.

Details of all our roses are available on our web site. Over 1000 varieties to choose from.

www.countrygardenroses.co.uk

READ MORE >

 

May 15 • 2012 • GrowersKarismaRose NewsVarietiesVegetablesWater.Horticultureroses

ROSE NEWS FROM AROUND THE WORLD

INDIA

Roses Are Blooming In Bangalore

  From Vegetables To Roses

The saying ‘life always finds its way’ seems to have come true in the case of rose growers in the villages of Hoskote taluk (Bangalore Rural district). Despite the severe water crisis, they have been able to rake in the moolah. It is now a life of regular income and comfort for these farmers who are cultivating new varieties of roses, requiring less water. Farmers in the villages around Hoskote - once a well-known vegetable and floriculture belt - had to abandon their fields due to severe water scarity. The liberalisation era of the mid-90s witnessed massive change in land use in the region. The real estate boom which followed resulted in mass sale of agriculture land and encroachment of water bodies. This resulted in a drastic fall in the water table, affecting small and marginal farmers. When cultivation of water intensive crops like vegetables and flowers seemed impossible, the State Horticulture Department introduced the growers to small varieties of roses. They now sell their produce to neighbouring states. “There are three high-yielding varieties of roses - Karisma, five star and ruby red. They are in great demand in temples and to make garlands. These can be used for all purposes (mariage to cremation) both here as well as in the neighbouring states,” said a horticulture officer here. On large scale A visit to Alappanahalli, Ulsahalli, Upparhalli, Kumbalahalli, Kurubarahalli, Kolathur, Sonadahalli, Sompur and Kalhalli around Hoskote, shows that cultivation of roses is taking place on a large scale. The flowers are transported to places of religious importance in Tamil Nadu and Andhra Pradesh. According to farmers, most of the flowers cultivated here are sent to Tirupathi under contract farming. “It is a short-term contract between the contractor and farmer - a farmer gets between Rs 45 to Rs 60 per kg of flowers, irrespective of the fluctuating price at which the contractor sells them,” said a senior horticulture officer on condition of anonymity.

These varieties of flowers, according to farmers, grow with very less water when compared to vegetables they cultivated earlier. Depleted water table “We used to cultivate vegetables which required watering every day. But the water table depleted abysmally in these parts. So, the farmers took to rose cultivation, which has proved to be a windfall. I earn between Rs 500 to Rs 1,000 per day,” said Yelappa, a farmer from Ulsahalli.

Subrayappa, another farmer, said these varieties of roses - unlike the Dutch rose variety grown earlier - needed very little water. “Even if we water the plants once a week through drip irrigation, it is sufficient,” he said. In some villages, where the water crisis is severe, the sewage water is used for the plants. These miniature rose varieties are cultivated on small patches of land and the entire family is involved in the cultivation. The farmers prune the plants to a height of three to four feet, so that harvesting becomes easy. Their work begins at 5.30 am and the flowers are dispatched to the junction, where they are weighed and loaded onto mini lorries numbering over 50, to be transported to neighbouring states before 7.30 am. The payment is made to the farmers once in 15 days. “Each farmer earns between Rs 25,000 to Rs 45,000 depending on the size of the land he owns,” said a horticulture officer. The horticulture department is encouraging the farmers by giving a subsidy of Rs 14,000 per acre, under the new area expansion scheme.

Details of all our roses are available on our web site. Over 1000 varieties to choose from.

www.countrygardenroses.co.uk

READ MORE >

 

May 12 • 2012 • CostelloElvisGoodRoses in SongYearbloomsplantsroses

ROSES IN SONG 24

Good Year For The Roses

Elvis Costello

I can hardly bear the sight of lipstick On the cigarettes there in the ashtray Lying cold the way you left them But at least your lips caressed them while you packed Or the lip-print on a half-filled cup of coffee That you poured and didn't drink But at least you thought you wanted it That's so much more than I can say for me

What a good year for the roses Many blooms still linger there The lawn could stand another mowing Funny I don't even care As you turn to walk away As the door behind you closes The only thing I have to say It's been a good year for the roses

After three full years of marriage It's the first time that you haven't made the bed I guess the reason we're not talking There's so little left to say we haven't said While a million thoughts go racing through my mind I find I haven't said a word From the bedroom the familiar sound Of our baby's crying goes unheard

What a good year for the roses Many blooms still linger there The lawn could stand another mowing Funny I don't even care As you turn to walk away As the door behind you closes The only thing I have to say It's been a good year for the roses

Details of all our roses are available on our web site. Over 1000 varieties to choose from.

www.countrygardenroses.co.uk

READ MORE >

 

Apr 27 • 2012 • AromaFragranceNoseRose NewsScentShropshireroses

ROSE NEWS FROM AROUND THE WORLD

UK

Gertrude Jekyll

 

DO YOU HAVE A ROSE NOSE ?

Think of the wonderful scents that your nose can bring you; the sweetness of a pie baking in the oven, the savory smell of bacon cooking and the aroma of fresh brewed coffee.

Naturally, there are some scents that are not so wonderful, such as something burning on the stove or the indication a baby’s diaper needs changing. Special training of one’s nose can lead to becoming a wine sommelier, a tea connoisseur or a 'rose nose' specialist.

Michael Marriott, the senior rosarian of David Austin Roses in Shropshire, has this very job of deciphering the fragrance of these English roses. His associate is another Austin 'rose nose' Robert Calkin, the acclaimed British perfumer and floral fragrance educator.

Together they amble about the nearly two-acre show garden, sniffing roses and debating and fine tuning their thoughts on its signature scent characteristics. Marriott says the fragrance in roses comes from two different sources. Most commonly it comes from the petals, but sometimes it also emanates from the stamens. This is especially true in varieties with single or semidouble flowers where stamens are abundant.

In the petals, the greater part of any rose scent originates from its mix of just four or five different primary oils. Professionals call these a scent’s 'base notes'. But rose scents are complex, with as many as 200 to 300 possible other oils present, often in minute quantities. This mix yields the wonderful richness found in rose fragrances.

The oils are formed from precursors, which are produced at the bud stage, three or four days before the flower opens. The warmer it is (within reason) at this stage, the more precursors are produced and the stronger the fragrance. The great variety of resulting oils will combine to produce the old rose, fruity, myrrh and tea fragrances.

The fragrance of the stamens of single and semidouble flowers is often musky in character, and also clove-like. Cloves are a preservative, so it could be that the fragrance does in fact help to prevent decline in the stamens. Some varieties, especially from the Hybrid Musk group of roses, combine the fragrance from both the petals and the stamens.

Marriott advises when smelling a rose, not to just give it a quick sniff. Smell it as you might savour a good wine by rolling it around the nose. Everybody's nose smells things differently, so don't be shy about describing the scents you sense or detect.

It is also important to smell several different flowers on any given bush, as some might not readily resonate, while others exuberantly exhibit their fragrance. Sometimes, the fragrance can be very different, according to the age of a particular flower.

A few of the most fragrant English roses are ‘Gerturde Jekyll’ that has an old rose fragrance that is strong, rich and perfectly balanced. ‘Lady Emma Hamilton’ is fruity with hints of pear, grape and citrus, ‘The Generous Gardener’ has an old rose fragrance of musk and myrrh, and ‘Princess Alexandra of Kent’ has a tea fragrance of lemon and black currant.

Myrrh appeared in David Austin’s first rose, the onceflowering ‘Constance Spry’, as a powerful, spicy top note inherited from one of the parents, ‘Belle Isis’, a strongly perfumed Gallica type.

‘Constance Spry’s' is considered a quintessential rose fragrance

Details of all our roses are available on our web site. Over 1000 varieties to choose from.

www.countrygardenroses.co.uk

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Apr 15 • 2012 • BudHybridRose TipsTeafloribundaplantsroses

ROSE TIPS

CHANDOS BEAUTY 

ROSE TIPS

Create bigger roses:

When buds on hybrid tea roses appear, save the lead bud and remove the side buds for larger roses. Remove them early or you'll get smaller roses. Do the opposite with floribundas; remove the center bud so the side buds can size up for larger bouquets.

Details of all our roses are available on our web site. Over 1000 varieties to choose from.

www.countrygardenroses.co.uk

READ MORE >

 

Mar 29 • 2012 • Rose Newsgiftgolden rosepoperosesspecialthorns

ROSE NEWS FROM AROUND THE WORLD

CUBA

THE GOLDEN ROSE CUSTOM

Monday evening local time the sanctuary of the Virgen de la Caridad de Cobre in Cuba received a gift: Pope Benedict XVI. honoured it with a golden rose, a custom going back to the middle ages, popes used to hold such a golden rose during a procession on fourth Sunday of lent, called Laetare. Pope Eugene III. called this rose a sign of Christ’s passion: the gold symbolizing the resurrection and the thorns the suffering.

These roses were conferred to dignitaries of the Church, and they carried a double meaning: the conferral served as both an honour and a reminder: do not forget the responsibilities that come with being a Christian. In that spirit the group of recipients widened, princes and kings received it as well as abbeys and sanctuaries. Today, only the latter are being honoured by this special grace. Benedict XVI. gave roses to Altötting and Mariazell, Fatima and Aparecida. To these he today added the sanctuary of the Virgen de la Caridad. The rose is not the only remarkable gift that can be found there. Already pope John Paul II. had given a golden crown, with which he had crowned the mother of God national patron saint of Cuba. Ernest Hemingway’s Nobel-prize for literature can also be found there, after receiving it in 1954 he dedicated it to the Virgin. It was stolen, given back and now it is kept safe. Among these famous dedications there are numerous others, for example a plaque a mother gave, asking the Virgen de la Caridad to keep her sons safe from the guerrillas. The names of her sons: Raúl and Fidel Castro. (Fr. Bernd Hagenkord, SJ reporting from Cuba)

Details of all our roses are available on our web site. Over 1000 varieties to choose from.

www.countrygardenroses.co.uk

READ MORE >

 

Mar 11 • 2012 • BushesFlowersHybridRose Newsgardenersnurseryroses

ROSE NEWS FROM AROUND THE WORLD

USA

ROSE INDUSTRY NOT LOOKING GOOD IN THE STATES

BELOVED 

For a century, devoted gardeners have appreciated the marvels of delicate and finicky hybrid roses and referred to them by name, like pets or family. The product of generations of breeding, the queen of flowers could act like a spoiled princess because its delicate blooms offered a special reward.

In recent years, though, time-strapped homeowners have traded their big teas for compact shrub roses — utilitarian soldiers in the landscape that could cover ground without fuss. Our desire for the carefree — no-iron shirts, no-wax floors, and now low-maintenance yards — has brought the rose industry to a crossroads. "At some point, it becomes a self-fulfilling prophecy," said Charlie Anderson, president of Weeks Roses, the only major company still creating new varieties of full-size roses. "[Landscape] roses will be all you have; the beautiful, unique hybrid teas will be gone." The flagging economy has compounded the rose industry's troubles. Two years ago, rose giant Jackson & Perkins, which had annually shipped 10 million bushes nationwide, filed for bankruptcy protection. Many of the hybrid roses the company created — such as Diana, Catalina and Beloved — may soon disappear from the mass market as the supply of those bushes dries up. "Roses are viewed as an extravagance, and they're still trying to shed that stigma," said Seth Taylor of Capital Nursery. "People have a very specific thing in mind when they think of a rose — it's full and lush and romantic. That's your traditional rose, what people love," Taylor said. "The single-petaled shrub roses are gaining a foothold with the public, but when my customers look at those flowers, they say, 'That's not a rose.'" While gardeners may have visions of old-fashioned roses plucked from cottage gardens, their interest in growing them has waned, said Jolene Adams, incoming national president of the American Rose Society. "Many homeowners have had some experience — usually in their mother's or grandmother's gardens — so they'll try growing roses," she said. "But without sufficient knowledge [on how to care for them], the roses languish and do not grow to their full, beautiful potential. And they're not replaced if they die." Most of the nation's rosebushes originate in California's Central Valley. But unlike with wheat or tomatoes, it takes several years to produce a single crop of rosebushes. Hybridizers typically will test 400,000 seedlings to find one or two new varieties. Once selected, a new hybrid will be developed for seven to 10 years before it's released into the market. When ready for sale, field-grown bushes are 2 years old. Winter is prime rose-planting time. But this month, local gardeners are finding limited selections at nurseries and home centers. "I observed dramatically fewer roses in the nurseries this year," said T.J. David, co-founder of the World Peace Rose Garden in Sacramento's Capitol Park. "The financial ills of the rose growers will cause a slowdown in the number of new varieties of roses that are available for sale," he said. "Since growers make plans years in advance, it may take a year or two to see the full impact." The annual wholesale value of California's rose crop dropped 55% to $27.20 million in 2010 from a high of $61.05 million in 2003, according to nursery industry expert Hoy Carman, a retired UC Davis professor. "The whole nursery industry is down," Carman said. "In 2008, sales just plummeted." Said Adams of the Rose Society: "Roses are not the first thing homeowners think of when they want to plant a garden. Competition with other choice plants is fierce.... The industry is going to have to change — and supply roses that the customers can use in the landscape." Most major rose growers have gone bankrupt or consolidated with other wholesale nurseries. Weeks Roses, in Wasco near Bakersfield, survived its bankruptcy and is now owned by Indiana-based Gardens Alive Inc. On 1,000 leased acres, Weeks will harvest about 3 million bushes this year. During grafting and harvest season, it employs almost 400 people. Jackson & Perkins, acquired by J&P Park Acquisitions Inc. of South Carolina, no longer develops and grows new roses. Before bankruptcy, the company farmed 5,000 acres in Wasco with 20,000 bushes per acre. Without buyers, many of those bushes were burned. Once a breeder goes bankrupt, its roses usually disappear with it. Rose patents — good for 18 to 20 years — may be sold, but budwood and mother plants are lost. Many Jackson & Perkins roses are now on the endangered list. "Some will be preserved," Anderson said. "But a lot of varieties were lost; there was no budwood to collect [to create new hybrid bushes]. Most will just disappear into the ether."

Details of all our roses are available on our web site. Over 1000 varieties to choose from.

www.countrygardenroses.co.uk

 

READ MORE >

 

Mar 08 • 2012 • FlowersMillion. RosesRed RosesRomanticscarlet

Who Said "Romance Was Dead"

A MILLION ROSES

Based on a romantic pop hit from Soviet times, a Kazakh man has ordered one million red roses for his wife on International Women's Day that will be observed on Thursday.

The man had a spat with his wife and sought to make up to her, according to the Express-K.kz news website.

The order for one million Dutch-grown roses was placed with a florist in Kyzylorda city in Kazakhstan and is to be delivered on Thursday.

Local prices for roses on International Women's Day ranged from 500 to 2,000 Tenge ($3 to $13) per flower, which means the one-million order could cost the caring husband between $3 million and $13 million.

The 'Million Roses' song was popularised by Soviet pop diva Alla Pugacheva in 1982.

The song, which tells a story of an artist trying to win a woman's heart through the gift of flowers, sold over six million copies as a single.

English Translation.

Once upon the time there was a painter He had a little house and canvas But he loved an actress who loved flowers He then sold his home Sold his paintings and his shelter And with all the money he bought a whole sea of flowers

A million of scarlet roses From the window you can see The one, who is seriously in love, transforms his life into flowers for you

A million of scarlet roses From the window you can see The one, who is seriously in love, transforms his life into flowers for you

In the morning, you stand at the window Maybe you've gone crazy As in a continuation of a dream The plaza is full of flowers Your soul grows cold What rich man is making fun by here? But under the window, almost breathless, the poor painter stands

A million of scarlet roses From the window you can see The one, who is seriously in love, transforms his life into flowers for you

A million of scarlet roses From the window you can see The one, who is seriously in love, transforms his life into flowers for you

The encounter was short At night, the train carried her away But in her life remained the mad song of roses k The painter kept living alone Many troubles he beared But in his life remained the whole plaza of flowers

Details of all our roses are available on our web site. Over 1000 varieties to choose from.

www.countrygardenroses.co.uk

READ MORE >

 

Rose News From Around The World

INDIA

Rose Festival. 40th Year and still going strong.

Rose Festival, Chandigarh is held in the famous Rose Garden at Chandigarh. This is largest Rose Show in the country. This festival is celebrated in the Rose Garden every year in the end of the month of February or during the first few days of March. The festival is organized to encourage the people to enjoy the bloom of different type of roses here

As Chandigarh’s Rose Festival this week enters its 40th year, residents throng in large numbers.

The star attractions are the millions of roses themselves, but there is also a host of activities, including competitions and cultural shows, at the festival being held at Rose Garden in upscale Sector 16 here from Feb 24 to 26.

Children would be crowned “Rose Prince” and “Rose Princess” and there will be painting and flower contests. Commercial and food stalls will be set up in the adjoining Leisure Valley in Sector 10.

In recent years, the footfall at the festival has crossed over 300,000, officials here said.

The Rose Garden has nearly 40,000 rose plants of over 800 rose species from all over the world.

The garden was set up in 1967 and was essentially the brainchild of Chandigarh’s first chief commissioner and keen horticulturist M.S. Randhawa – a man credited for giving the city millions of trees and a number of gardens and green belts.

The authorities here claim the Rose Garden, spread over nearly 30 acres, is the largest in Asia. Along with the roses, the garden also hosts trees of medicinal value.

“The Rose Festival is an important event for Chandigarh. Though the city itself is young, different generations of families have been coming in the last four decades to be part of it,” former councillor Chander Mukhi Sharma said .

The Rose Garden has been divided into 10 sections. These sections are not only for roses but also for a children’s play area, scrubs, medicinal plants, a hillock and musical fountains.

Some of the roses at the garden have been named after international and other personalities – from Britain’s Queen Elizabeth and former US president John F. Kennedy to former prime minister Lal Bahadur Shastri and M.S. Randhawa.

Some of the unusual names given to the rose varieties are: Only You, Dulhan, King’s Ransom, Hippie Girl, Love Me Tender, Careless Love, Lover’s Meeting, Delhi Prince, Oklahoma, American Heritage, Louisiana, Canadian Centenary, City of Belfast, Wild Plum and Dorothy Peach.

“We have to take care of the roses so that they are in full bloom when the festival comes. This year the winters have been excessively cold,” said Subhash, a gardener.

For a few years the name of the festival was changed to Festival of Gardens by the local administration. However, for common people, it has always remained the Rose Festival.

Hundreds of people from Punjab, Haryana and Himachal Pradesh visit the city for the annual festival. They come here packed in buses, trucks and even tractor-trolleys. The festival also attracts people from other parts of the country and foreigners.

Chandigarh, which was planned and designed by French architect Le Corbusier and his team in the 1950s-60s as a symbol of a resurgent, independent India, has a total population of over one million.

Details of all our roses are available on our web site. Over 1000 varieties to choose from.

www.countrygardenroses.co.uk

 

READ MORE >

 

Feb 14 • 2012 • BushesFlowersHybrid RosesNew Roses For 2012Princess Of Walesbloomsgardeners

ROSE NEWS FROM AROUND THE WORLD

USA

THE FUTURE DOES NOT LOOK ROSY

PRINCESS OF WALES

Future generations may never know the beauty of Diana, Princess of Wales; sniff Catalina in the sunshine; or fall for Beloved. For a century, devoted gardeners have appreciated the marvels of delicate and finicky hybrid roses and referred to them by name, like pets or family. The product of generations of breeding, the queen of flowers could act like a spoiled princess because its delicate blooms offered a special reward. In recent years, though, time-strapped homeowners have traded their big teas for compact shrub roses—utilitarian soldiers in the landscape that could cover ground without fuss. Our desire for the carefree—no-iron shirts, no-wax floors, and now low-maintenance yards—has brought the rose industry to a crossroads. “At some point, it becomes a self-fulfilling prophecy. (Landscape) roses will be all you have; the beautiful, unique hybrid teas will be gone,” said Charlie Anderson, president of Weeks Roses, the only major company still creating new varieties of full-size roses. The flagging economy has compounded the rose industry’s troubles. Two years ago, rose giant Jackson & Perkins, which had annually shipped 10 million bushes countrywide, filed for bankruptcy protection. Many of the hybrid roses the company created—such as Diana, Catalina and Beloved—may soon disappear from the mass market as the supply of those bushes dries up. “Roses are viewed as an extravagance and they’re still trying to shed that stigma,” said Seth Taylor of Capital Nursery. “People have a very specific thing in mind when they think of a rose—it’s full and lush and romantic. That’s your traditional rose, what people love,” Taylor said. “The single-petaled shrub roses are gaining a foothold with the public, but when my customers look at those flowers, they say ‘That’s not a rose.’ “ While gardeners may have visions of old-fashioned roses plucked from cottage gardens, their interest in growing them has waned, said Jolene Adams, incoming national president of the American Rose Society. “Many homeowners have had some experience—usually in their mother’s or grandmother’s gardens—so they’ll try growing roses,” she said. “But without sufficient knowledge (on how to care for them), the roses languish and do not grow to their full, beautiful potential. And they’re not replaced if they die.” Most of the United States’ rose bushes originate in California’s Central Valley. But unlike wheat or tomatoes, it takes several years to produce a single crop of rose bushes. Hybridizers typically will test 400,000 seedlings to find one or two new varieties. Once selected, a new hybrid will be developed for seven to 10 years before it’s released into the market. When ready for sale, field-grown bushes are 2 years old. Winter is prime rose-planting time. Valentine’s Day also spurs sales. But this month, local gardeners are finding limited selections at nurseries and home centers. “I observed dramatically fewer roses in the nurseries this year,” said T.J. David, co-founder of the World Peace Rose Garden in Sacramento’s Capitol Park. “The financial ills of the rose growers will cause a slowdown in the number of new varieties of roses that are available for sale,” he said. “Since growers make plans years in advance, it may take a year or two to see the full impact.” The annual wholesale value of California’s rose crop dropped 55 percent from a high of $61.05 million in 2003 to $27.20 million in 2010, according to nursery industry expert Hoy Carman, a retired University of California-Davis professor. “The whole nursery industry is down,” Carman said. “In 2008, sales just plummeted.” Said Adams of the Rose Society: “Roses are not the first thing homeowners think of when they want to plant a garden. Competition with other choice plants is fierce. ... The industry is going to have to change—and supply roses that the customers can use in the landscape.” Most major rose growers have gone bankrupt or consolidated with other wholesale nurseries. Weeks Roses, in Wasco near Bakersfield, Calif., survived its bankruptcy and is now owned by Indiana-based Gardens Alive. On 1,000 leased acres, Weeks will harvest about 3 million bushes this year. During grafting and harvest season, it employs almost 400 people. Jackson & Perkins, acquired by South Carolina-based J&P Park Acquisitions, no longer develops and grows new roses. Before bankruptcy, the company farmed 5,000 acres in Wasco with 20,000 bushes per acre. Without buyers, many of those bushes were burned. Once a breeder goes bankrupt, its roses usually disappear with it. Rose patents—good for 18 to 20 years—may be sold, but budwood and mother plants are lost. Many Jackson & Perkins roses are now on the endangered list. “Some will be preserved,” Anderson said. “But a lot of varieties were lost; there was no budwood to collect (to create new hybrid bushes). Most will just disappear into the ether.”

Details of all our roses are available on our web site. Over 1000 varieties to choose from.

www.countrygardenroses.co.uk

 

READ MORE >

 

Feb 09 • 2012 • FragileGardenHeartPerfectRedRoseRoses in Poetrygold

Roses In Poetry

A PERFECT ROSE Richard Netherland Cook

So deep and pure, the one I chose From this earthly garden. a perfect rose, Fragile, yet it only bends, In times of rain and days of winds.

Close to my heart, this rose I hold, Its' beauty to me like solid gold, A perfect rose that means so much, That I am thrilled by a single touch.

A perfect rose it has been said, Is the symbol of love, a long stem red, No others can or will compete For my perfect rose so soft and sweet.

My love for the rose, a beauty still, Has not faded and never will, This rose I hold, the one I chose, My loving wife, a perfect rose.

Details of all our roses are available on our web site. Over 1000 varieties to choose from.

www.countrygardenroses.co.uk

READ MORE >

 

Rose Facts And Trivia

St Valentine's Day Roses 

Roses are the traditional gift given on Valentines Day, but they're certain to be well-received any time of year. But before you buy roses, know what message you're sending.

The color of a rose can have a very different meaning from what you intend. To ensure that your love understands what the roses you bestow mean, check this guide to rose colors and their meanings:

Red Roses

Red roses proclaim "I love you." They are the ultimate symbol of romantic love and enduring passion. Florists can't keep up with Valentines Day demand for red roses, which makes them especially expensive in February.

Yellow Roses Yellow roses indicate friendship and freedom -- so don't send them if your intentions are romantic and long-lasting. Yellow roses are also appropriate for sending congratulations to newlyweds, and new mothers.

Pale Pink Roses Pale pink roses connote grace, gentleness, and gratitude.

Light Pink Roses A joy to behold, light pink roses express fun and happiness.

Deep Pink Roses Deep pink roses say "Thank you." They have also come to be associated with the fight against breast cancer.

Lilac Roses Lilac roses indicate the sender has fallen in love at first sight with the recipient and is enchanted.

White Roses Pure white roses symbolize truth and innocence. They also send other messages: "I miss you" and "You're heavenly."

Peach Roses Peach roses speak of appreciation and gratitude.

Coral Roses Coral roses express one thing with their passionate colour: Desire.

Orange Roses Orange roses communicate enthusiasm and desire on the part of the sender'.

www.countrygardenroses.co.uk

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Jan 30 • 2012 • FlowersFreshPreservingRose NewsSpecial GiftValentineromantic valentineroses

MAKE YOUR ROSES LAST LONGER

Roses are one of the most common valentine's day gift.

Preserving those rose stalks fresh for a long time is really difficult and all attempts to keep that special gift goes in vain after a day! To keep the flower vase bright and lively with fresh rose stalks, here are few tips to maintain the rose flowers and make them last longer.

Tips to keep rose stalks fresh: 1. The flower vase should be clean from bacteria. Scrub and wash the vase with hot water and bleach to kill bacterias which reduces the freshness of the rose. 2. It is best to store rose flowers in a cold place. This maintains the flowers and lasts long. You can either store the rose flowers in refrigerator overnight or keep them in cold water. 3. Sprinkle a pinch of bleach in water before putting the stalks. This prevents the growth of bacteria. 4. You can also store the rose flowers in warm water for one day. This keeps the rose flowers fresh for a long time as cut roses easily absorb warm water. 5. Always remove leaves from the from the bottom of the rose stem. Leaves rot and can easily grow bacteria. So, remove all foliage from the bottom. 6. Cut the rose stalk from bottom to keep it hydrated and fresh. You can cut everyday to keep it fresh. Fresh cuts enhances the glow and makes the rose flowers look fresh and last longer. 7. Keep the flower vase in a cold place where there is less humidity and sunlight. This prevents the rose flowers from drying. 8. Change the water everyday to make the rose stalks last longer. Cut the stalk from the bottom regularly to keep the flowers fresh. You can cut at an angle of 45 degree angle to allow easy absorption of water. Whether the rose flowers are cut from the garden or bought from the florist shop, you would like to spread its smell and aroma in the house for days! Follow these tips to keep the rose fresh and bright for long. Store your romantic valentine's gift in a cool place and keep in the refrigerator at night if required.

Details of all our roses are available on our web site. Over 1000 varieties to choose from.

www.countrygardenroses.co.uk

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Jan 28 • 2012 • Rose Newsbouquetmedicineroses

ROSE NEWS FROM AROUND THE WORLD

USA

ROSES ARE THE BEST MEDICINE

As Gail Saivar checked out at Trader Joe’s on Tuesday, the cashier asked how the day was going. “Great,” she shot back, “if you don’t count the guy who took a right turn from the left lane into my car when I was driving home — from my radiation treatment.” Saivar collected her groceries, walked to the parking lot and was backing out in her crippled car when there was a knock on the passenger window. It was cashier Paul Gobel, proffering a bouquet of roses. “We’ve all had days like that,” he said. “He turned mine around,” says Saivar.

www.countrygardenroses.co.uk

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