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Jun 09 • 2013 • ButterflyGardenRNRSRoseRoyal National Rose SocietySocietySt Albanschiswell

GREAT NEWS FROM THE RNRS

EVERYTHING is coming up roses for a threatened St Albans tourist attraction which faced closure because it could not resolve parking difficulties. The Royal National Rose Society (RNRS), which has its internationally-known gardens in Chiswell Green, warned last August that not only the garden but also the society itself would have to close if it could not get permanent parking for visitors. But this week RNRS chief executive Roz Hamilton and John Breheny, chairman and chief executive of civil engineering company Breheny which now owns 95 per cent of the neighbouring Butterfly World, announced that agreement had been reached between the two parties not only about parking but also other collaborations including joint ticketing and discounted entry to both attractions. A delighted Roz said: “We need to build on the positiveness of both sides because we can complement each other so much. I think it is good for both organisations, not just locally but from a tourist perspective.” St Albans council leader, Julian Daly, who had brokered several meetings between the two parties, also welcomed the agreement. He said: “I think together they will be much more successful than individually. It has taken a long time but this is the next stage and a sensible step for everyone.” The agreement follows years of rancour between the two parties which left the Gardens of the Rose unable to open for more than a few weeks in the summer because it could not get planning permission for anything other than temporary parking for visitors. Negotiations about using car parking at Butterfly World, which was built on land sold by the RNRS to founder Clive Farrell, kept stalling and the impasse led to a decision by the RNRS that closure would be inevitable unless the situation could be resolved. RNRS president Bernard Williams said this week: “We could not survive with just a six-week opening period. We have to be open for the whole season.” When the Herts Advertiser revealed that the RNRS and its gardens might have to close, we launched our Keep the Roses Blooming campaign and support poured in both to this newspaper and the RNRS. Breheny’s purchase of the majority of Butterfly World resulted in round-the-table discussions and the two parties agreed that parking for garden visitors would be on the Butterfly World site and joint ticketing arrangements introduced. Although it is too late for the gardens to open for more than a limited period this summer, from next year it hopes to open all summer long as well as get a licence for wedding ceremonies to be performed there. Mr Breheny said on Monday that when his company became the majority shareholder, it had become aware that there were problems in the background between Butterfly World and RNRS and was keen to resolve them for the benefit of both parties. He confirmed that the butterfly biome, which was to have been the centrepiece of the project under Clive Farrell’s plans, would not be built in the current financial climate but it was hoped that Butterfly World would open as an all-year-round attraction in the near future. The limited opening period at the Gardens of the Rose in the past few years had hit the RNRS hard because even in those few weeks of opening, it raised more income from visitors than from membership. Eighty per cent of its visitors are from overseas as the gardens house one of only two rose trial grounds in the world. The gardens celebrate their 50th anniversary this July during the 2013 opening period from June 8 until July 29. Butterfly World will remain open until November 3 this year.

Details of all our roses are available on our web site. Over 1000 varieties to choose from.

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Oct 15 • 2012 • GardensGrenNationalRoseRose NewsRoyalSocietychiswell

Rose News From Around The World

UK

Gardens of the Rose

Latest News

HOPES are rising that an end could be in sight for the car parking problems which have plagued the Gardens of the Rose in Chiswell Green.

St Albans council leader, Julian Daly, and planning portfolio holder, Teresa Heritage, arranged a round-the-table meeting last month with the Royal National Rose Society (RNRS) and the neighbouring Butterfly World to try and resolve the parking issue.

And RNRS chief executive, Roz Hamilton, said that as a result the situation was “looking positive”. They should know by the end of the year if they can share parking with Butterfly World, extend their opening hours and look at obtaining such valuable assets as a wedding licence which would ease the RNRS’s financial plight.

The rose gardens in Chiswell Green Lane have been forced to limit their hours of opening in the summer for several years because of the parking issue which followed the sale of part of the RNRS land to Butterfly World.

It has meant that the RNRS has to rely on temporary permission from the district council for visitors to park there for a period of only weeks.

But with the annual opening of the gardens the biggest money spinner for the RNRS, Roz said in August that the society had already agreed it could not continue and would have to close the gardens as well unless it obtained planning permission for 30 adjoining permanent parking places.

The closure warning in the Herts Advertiser prompted numerous letters of support both to this newspaper and the RNRS and Cllr Daly said at the time he was going to make another bid to bring all parties together around the table.

Roz said this week that Butterfly World had agreed in principle to share parking, a decision which was awaiting ratification from the company which has the mortgage on the land, and admitted that the situation was, “looking positive”.

Another round-the-table meeting will be convened in early November. Should the issue still remain unresolved, the RNRS will go ahead with submitting their application for 30 permanent spaces which had been due to go to the council this month.

Roz praised all the people who had backed the RNRS and wanted to see the Gardens of the Rose remain open. She added: “I want to thank everyone for all the support we have had.”

Details of all our roses are available on our web site. Over 1000 varieties to choose from.

www.countrygardenroses.co.uk

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Aug 11 • 2012 • BushesFlowerGardensRoseRose GardensSocietyWeatherchiswellro

ROSE NEWS FROM AROUND THE WORLD

UK

GARDENS OF THE ROSE UNDER THREAT

THE future of the Gardens of the Rose and the society which runs it hinges on the success of a planning application for parking which is being submitted next month.

 

The rose gardens in Chiswell Green Lane have just closed after this summer’s temporary five-week opening period during which visitor numbers were down because of the poor weather.

Despite that shortfall, opening the gardens is the biggest money spinner for the Royal National Rose Society (RNRS) and raises more than income from membership.

But unless the RNRS succeeds in getting planning permission for 30 permanent parking spaces adjoining the gardens, both the society and the grounds will be forced to close.

The Gardens of the Rose have been a visitor attraction in St Albans for many years but the parking situation has been problematical since part of the RNRS land was sold for the creation of Butterfly World next door and the two were to have shared access and parking.

But the society and Butterfly World were unable to reach agreement and as a result, the RNRS has to apply for temporary parking for a short period in the summer – and unless it can reach a permanent resolution the board has already decided that closure is the only answer.

Chief executive Roz Hamilton confirmed this week: “We are putting in another planning application for 30 parking spaces just outside the gardens and if we don’t get that we can’t continue.”

The sticking point is that the site the RNRS wants to use is in the Green Belt and has already been turned down for planning permission before.

But it is throwing everything at one final attempt including a commissioned report about the number of accidents around the site – none of which have happened in the summer when the gardens are open – the site’s reclassification as a leisure facility and an offer to put in mature trees to screen the parking site from view.

The gardens were open from June 9 until July 29 this year and although visitors were down from between 8,000 and 9,000 to 6,500 because of the weather, the opening still accounts for more than 50 per cent of the RNRS income because of the success of the tea room and rose sales.

Ideally the gardens would open for four months a year so visitors could see the second flush of roses in the summer and it would have a licence to conduct weddings – which cannot happen until a permanent resolution of the parking situation is reached.

Roz said: “This planning application is critical because if it doesn’t succeed the society will fold and the garden will close.”

She added: “It is a long fight we have had here and we are eternal optimists but you have to take a realistic view of the financial situation and we can’t survive unless we take more money from our garden opening.”

Details of all our roses are available on our web site.

Over 1000 varieties to choose from.

www.countrygardenroses.co.uk

   

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May 27 • 2012 • FamousFrenchPetalsPinkRoseRose NewsSeedlingSocietyWinnergold

Rose News From Around The World

USA

PEACE

The Most Famous Rose In The World 

Roses often have a story that brings the past to life. While learning about one rose, I discovered a story that explains why my grandmother grew it in her garden.

In 1951, the American Rose Society made Peace the first rose to receive its Gold Medal Award, coinciding with the signing of our treaty of peace with Japan following postwar occupation. Ten years later, more than ?30 million of these rosebushes bloomed worldwide.

But the development of this rose began much earlier, in 1935, as one of 800 seedlings produced in 1935 by French rose breeder Francis Meilland. Of his 800 new roses, 50 were selected and in 1939, Meilland saw the one with creamy ivory petals with pink edges, No. 3-35-?40 and knew he had a winner. The same year, at an international conference of rose hybridizers in France, this was the rose that everyone noticed.

With the beginning of World War II, Meilland realized the fate of his flowers could be in jeopardy so he sent cuttings of his new rose to grower friends in Italy, Germany and the United States. They were reportedly smuggled out of France to the United States just before the Nazi invasion. As the war raged, the rose breeder was cut off from all communications with the outside world.

In the United States, Robert Pyle of the Conard-Pyle Co. was amazed at the blooms on No. 3-35-40 when he propagated more plants from Meilland’s cuttings. Pyle sent them to the American Rose Society for testing. In 1944, after France was liberated, Pyle wrote to tell Meilland that he planned to release the plants once the war ended.

On April 29, 1945, the rose was christened “Peace” at the Pacific Rose Society Annual Exhibition, the very day that Berlin fell to the Allies. Noted for its color, hardiness and disease resistance, Peace revived the hybrid tea rose industry. In 1945, Pyle described it to Meilland as “a glorious rose, its pale gold, cream and ivory petals blending to a lightly ruffled edge of delicate carmine. I am convinced this will be the greatest rose of the century.”

With the formal surrender of Germany on May 8, 1945, the 49 delegates who met to form the United Nations were each presented with a Peace bloom. Peace was named the winner of the All-American Rose Selections Award of Honor in August 1945, and the war ended in Japan.

This rose certainly survived against all odds. Peace remains one of the most celebrated and popular roses in history, still thriving in gardens ?across the world.

This Memorial Day provides an opportunity to honor those who have made the ultimate sacrifice on behalf of our nation. It allows us to show support to their loved ones and families. My grandmother knew about that sacrifice firsthand. One son came home from World War II, but one gave his life. And so I now know why she was so fond of this rose. I accompanied her when bouquets were placed on the church altar, taken to the sick and to the bereaved.

While peace in the world may be difficult, peace in the garden is certainly possible. I believe my grandmother found peace in her garden and she made it our place, where she nurtured my love of all things growing.

Details of all our roses are available on our web site. Over 1000 varieties to choose from.

www.countrygardenroses.co.uk

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