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The Road to Silver Gilt!

A lot of time and effort went into building our display for Shrewsbury Flower Show 2016, and it really showed! Click "Read More" to see pictures of the beautiful stand created by Jack Kitson and his team, and watch it go through the building process!

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Shrewsbury Flower Show 2016

The Country Garden Roses show garden, at Shrewsbury Flower Show 2016, has been awarded a silver gilt.

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Journal of a rose gardener...Weeds..tearoom..shows 07/07/16

Its been busy, busy, busy here at the Nursery , so we thought we would give you a heads up on the following, planting pond margins, dealing with problem weeds, deadheading roses...and more

The tearoom is in full swing providing legendary homemade cakes and scones.

We are at Shrewsbury Flower show, Wem Vehicles Of Interest Show, where we would love to meet you and a offer advise.

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Jun 01 • 2012 • LoveRomanceRomanticRoseRose NewsShowSpring

Rose News From Around The World

KOREA

A ROMANTIC ROSE SHOW

Spring is the season of weddings, new beginnings and romance. So what better way to celebrate it than being surrounded by roses, the symbol of unconditional love?

The rose has been Korea’s best-loved flower since the first survey of favourite flowers was conducted in 1990, according to research company Gallup Korea. Approximately one million of the affectionately named “queen of flowers” greet visitors in the gardens of Everland at its 27th annual Rose Festival, which will continue through June 17 at the Yongin amusement park, an hour drive south from Seoul. It started on May 11. Four differently themed gardens boast 850 different species of roses in all colors, ranging from the classic red, soft orange, vibrant yellow, light violet and pure white.

The four rose gardens are “perfect” places for lovers to enjoy each others’ company.

Out of the four, the Victoria Garden is arguably the best area for a lovers’ stroll. As the name suggests, it was built in the British Victorian style, characterized by repeating patterns and archways. Rose buds climb up the white fence walls, which surround a wide area full of flowers. The roses are planted in a circular arrangement with the pathways forming a circle with a cross through the centre. Lovers and families alike stroll through the garden hand in hand. Visitors can stop anywhere on the path for a picture as the rose-filled archways surrounding the garden provide a memorable backdrop. The Cupid Garden’s name alone is enough to attract couples. The small garden beside the Victorian one is dedicated to young lovers. In the center is a good spot for pictures with the statue of the winged god of love.

On the outskirts of the Cupid and Victoria gardens are fields of red roses. One of the most unique roses of the red colouring is Love. These roses have petals that are red on the inside and white on the back, resembling a lover’s blushing face.

The Venus Garden, located opposite the Cupid, boasts even more statues. White statues, which resemble famous Greek artwork like the Venus de Milo, decorate this area. The fountain in the middle has a large stone centrepiece of an elegantly posed woman holding up a cup as if to toast lovers. Lion heads spout water into the fountain in four directions below her. The wide fountain is flanked by benches, which provide an intimate atmosphere for couples looking for a place to rest. Couples can also be seen lining up to take photographs on a white bench under white Greek columns and a small streetlamp.

“It’s even more beautiful at night,” said Kim Ju-won, 49, who said this is her second time at the Rose Festival. “The lamps light up and the whole place is surrounded by light.”

The Venus Garden connects into the Maze, inspired by the Knossos Palace in the ancient Greek myths. According to Greek mythology, King Minos of Knossos decided to create a labyrinth, or maze, to trap the Minotaur, a man-eating monster with the head of a bull and body of a man. Every year, Minos would send people into the maze as a sacrifice to keep the Minotaur content and to prevent it from escaping. This carefully constructed area combines walls of rose bushes with sharply angled corners, mimicking the structure of the maze. Some of these walls rise up to two meters, filling the place with a fragrant perfume when the wind blows through them. In the center of the maze is a fountain with the statue of two embracing lovers, who finally found each other after many twists and turns. They are celebrating the end of the journey with a kiss. "It's a great place to come for a date," said Jeon Hye-jun, 20, who visited the gardens with his girlfriend. "There are lots of places to take photos and create memories.” But the Rose Festival is not just for couples. Many of the sightseers are families and students on field trips, learning new facts about the familiar flower. “It’s my first time seeing orange roses,” said Lee Yeong-mi, 9, who took a day off with her parents to visit Everland. “It’s different from red roses, it’s pretty.” Visitors used to the typical red rose may be pleasantly surprised to find roses of all colors in the gardens. The rose Yume, which is light sherbet-orange in color, is famous for its voluminous petals. It is also relatively easy to grow for less experienced gardeners. Some of the roses even have romantic names, like White Christmas. With pure white petals befitting its name, this queen of white roses is called a masterpiece by many. “These roses are Everland’s pride. They only bloom in the warm season, but the rose bushes need to be taken care of year round, protected under greenhouses in the cold winter months,” an Everland spokesman told The Korea Times. There are also a number of performances, such as photo time with the “Ever-Bee,” and “Rosina's Love Adventure,” starring the princess of Rose Castle at the Four Seasons Gardens. The performance hours can be found on the Everland website (www.everland.com). Couples should also try to locate all seven heart-shaped rose topiaries, or plant structures, set up throughout the gardens. On another note, Everland also received media attention as it introduced a family of endangered golden snub-nosed monkeys to the public, May 24. The family members consist of the parents, Son O-gong and Son So-un, and their three naturally bred offspring, Sinbi, Tori and the baby, born March 31 this year.

Details of all our roses are available on our web site. Over 1000 varieties to choose from.

www.countrygardenroses.co.uk

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May 30 • 2012 • FlowerGardenPetalsRomanticRoseRose NewsShowSpringStem

Rose News From Around The World

BEIRUT

NEW DISEASE RESISTANT ROSE

 The Beirut Garden Show & Spring Festival opened at 4 p.m. Tuesday.

As the first visitors muddled their way in past an entrance staff still getting their bearings, exhibitors frenetically unpacked boxes and organized displays for the ninth edition of the annual event held at the Beirut Hippodrome. But the last minute scramble to preparedness did not distract from what promises to be a highly successful ushering in of the summer season.

The highlight of the opening evening was the unveiling of the Beirut Rose, a bloom cultivated by the French rose producer Meilland in tribute to the resilience of Lebanon’s capital city.

With each stem bearing five to 25 flowers and each flower comprising some 75 to 80 petals, the Beirut Rose is a jaunty, romantic-looking bloom, far less stiff and formal than its highly bred cousins. Moreover, the rose is 100 percent disease resistant and blooms continuously from June through December, embodying the tenacious nature of its namesake city, which has resurged from conflict and tragedy time and again.

The flower appeared to be an immediate hit, with the launch ceremony’s attendees eagerly sniffing the lightly scented Bengal pink blossom. Those who wish to procure the plant for themselves can do so at the Garden Show (at the price of LL20,000), while the flower will also be available all over the world through Meilland’s catalogue.

Meanwhile, the Beirut Rose will officially take root in the city Thursday morning at 11:30 a.m. when a planting ceremony is due to be held at Martyrs’ Square in Downtown.

Details of all our roses are available on our web site. Over 1000 varieties to choose from.

www.countrygardenroses.co.uk

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May 19 • 2012 • ChelseaDroughtFlowerJubileeRose NewsRoyalShowWeatherWettestgardeners

Rose News From Around The World

UK

Chelsea

POOR WEATHER AT CHELSEA CAUSES PROBLEMS

The Royal Jubilee rose looks worryingly floppy and the Turk's head lilies won't open on the penultimate buildup day

It was a mild, calm day at the Chelsea flower show on Friday, which is more than could be said for the gardeners. With a bitterly cold winter followed by a hot, dry March and the wettest April on record, plus the odd slash of hail and sleet in the last weeks of the buildup, their nerves were shredded.

Nigel DunneTt's rainwater-saving drought garden was built while rain was coming down in torrents. Now the rain had stopped, he had to fill the pools with tap water, and it was so dark that his swaths of Turk's head lilies would not open. "They will open," he said determinedly, "and if they don't, they look very nice as buds."

According to young David Austin, his arms full of a rose bush almost as tall as himself, this was "the worst Chelsea, no question, the worst". Old David Austin, founder of the eponymous rose-growers and still a flower show regular at 86, would be along any minute to check his work. All their show roses had to go back into heated glasshouses to persuade them to bloom in time, and some did not like the treatment at all – including Royal Jubilee, a new rose that is looking worryingly floppy before the Queen's visit on Monday evening.

"A lot of patience. A lot. But no swearing," Darren Share, head of Birmingham council's gardens, said firmly. The centrepiece of the Brum garden is an old Mini, confiscated from a colleague's wife and now planted all over with sedum. "Done her a favour. I reckon we saved somebody's life when we took the engine out of that."

If the plants all die in Tony Heywood and Alison Condie's Glamourland, it would be an artistic statement more than a disaster. Their concept garden is about the struggle between natural and artificial worlds, with a soundtrack nightmarishly mixing birdsong and computer game noises. So far nature seemed to be winning, Condie conceded, down on her knees tidying the ground-cover plants that were being pecked to pieces by birds, and breathing in a heady reek of fox pee.

Diarmuid Gavin was reclining on a sofa 12 metres (40ft) up in the air, giggling. "Anywhere you like – astonish me!" he chirped as one of his gardeners staggered past, weighed down by pots of lilies. Last year he created Chelsea's first and almost certainly last flying garden, hauled into the air by a crane. While working on that he was walking along the river past Albert bridge, which was swaddled in scaffolding while being refurbished, and had a brainwave for this year's show: the hanging gardens of Babylon, on five levels and 24 metres tall, involving 4.2 miles of scaffolding and trees sprouting out at wild angles.

The way up is by alarmingly swaying lift past the first-floor vegetable garden, second-floor bar and third-floor potting shed, to the rooftop. Down, for the brave, is by stainless steel tube slide, inspired by Carsten Höller's at the Tate. "I'm going to do something really special next year, I've got it all in my head, just you wait," Gavin said. "It'll be a surprise."

In truth, the only way he could surprise Chelsea is if he brings a neat rectangle of nicely mown lawn, with a few daisies to add excitement.

She probably would not say it too loudly in front of the gardeners, but the weather struck the deputy show manager, Sarah Easton, as pretty perfect. "No watering this year, so we're really happy," she said, "and the result of all that rain is that it all looks incredibly lush for visitors."

In the wretched weeks of April, she had a mud crew scraping the top level of soil off the show garden sites and a puddle crew on standby to pump out developing lakes. "Incredible camaraderie" developed as a result, she said.

Early visitors included Daniel Chamovitz, American author of What a Plant Knows, and a bit startled by the trench warfare of Chelsea on the penultimate buildup day: "Wow. More plywood than plants." He was charmed by a tiny Japanese-designed, moss-covered cottage. "What does moss know?" he pondered. "Moss doesn't really care. Give me water and light and let me just sit here and hang out and photosynthesise, that's what moss knows."

Details of all our roses are available on our web site. Over 1000 varieties to choose from.

www.countrygardenroses.co.uk

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Mar 02 • 2012 • AnniversaryEarthGrowMemorialPlantedRose GardenRose NewsRose Show

Rose News From Around The World

UK

NEW MEMORIAL ROSE GARDEN FOR DOVER

A ROSE garden will grow as a permanent memorial to the 193 men, women and children who died when the ill-fated Herald of Free Enterprise capsized off Zeebrugge 25 years ago.

Dover mayor Ronnie Philpott and the Reverend David Ridley, the vicar of St Mary's, turned the first spade of earth at the site at the rear of the Gateway flats last Friday. Twenty-five white rose bushes are expected to be planted at the plot in time for the memorial service at St Mary's on Tuesday.

Mr Ridley said: "There has never really been anywhere outside in Dover as a place for people to come and remember except for Whitfield Woods.

"The seafront is close to the port and so it seemed the appropriate place for it to be. As this is the 25th anniversary it also seemed a suitable time to do something."

Dover District Council donated the land and will plant the rose bushes while Dover Town Council will carry out the maintenance.

Mr Ridley added: "The roses should be in by March 6, in time for the service and, if not, then we will plant the first roses on that day."

Cllr Philpott added: "This is very important for the people of Dover as a mark of respect for the 25th anniversary.

"It is somewhere people can come every day of the year to remember their loved ones and reflect on things in general.

"It has a nice view of the sea and it is lovely that there are benches so people can sit down."

A remembrance service will be held at St Mary's, which has the names of those who died listed on a tablet at the foot of a memorial window, at 2.30pm on Tuesday with the Bishop of Dover, the Right Reverend Trevor Willmott, preaching.

Stars made of card will be signed by all those who want to leave messages and those messages, which will then be transcribed into a book of remembrance.

After the service, at 4.30pm, there will be a reunion for seafarers and family members in the parish centre followed by a dedication at the rose garden, which is at the site of the former fountain at the east end of the seafront gardens.

Following this, survivors and families of those who lost their lives will cast flowers into the water from the Prince of Wales Pier.

The church will be open from 10am to 6pm for those who wish to offer a silent prayer.

Dover mayor Ronnie Philpott and Councillor Sue Jones will also attend a memorial service on Sunday, March 4 in Zeebrugge.

The City Council of Bruges is inviting all survivors and families of those who died to the service, which starts at 9.30am.

To find out more e-mail [email protected]

AUSTRALIA

NEW VENUE FOR ROSE SHOW

 

The Barossa Rose and Floral Show has found a new home at Barossa Chateau at Lyndoch.

Mary Frick, secretary of the Australian Rose Society and a member of the Barossa Rose and Floral Show made the announcement at a celebration on Tuesday night.

Barossa Chateau was celebrating the 10th anniversary of the Queen opening the Barossa Chateau Rose Garden.

Queen Elizabeth II opened the garden in the year of her Golden Jubilee, on February 28, 2002.

Trevor Lang, David Ruston, Igor Moiseff, Dean Stringer and Tamara Moiseff, who all attended the garden opening ten years ago, joined in the anniversary celebrations.

A crowd of 110 attended to event, many of those from the rose fraternity, who were delighted to hear the news the Barossa Rose and Floral Show would call Barossa Chateau and the Rose Garden home.

Chateau owners Mark and Mandy Creed told the crowd they were fortunate enough to have the opportunity to reconnect the gardens of Lyndoch Hill and Barossa Chateau.

Lyndoch Hill covers about 15 acres, and once combined with Barossa Chateau, the overall area is around 25 acres.

About 22 acres of that is dedicated to gardens, so it has been returned to its original and intended design.

The gardens host over 30,000 roses, and while about 535 varieties have been identified, more than 2000 varieties were originally planted, both modern and heritage

Details of all our roses are available on our web site. Over 1000 varieties to choose from.

www.countrygardenroses.co.uk

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Rose News From Around The World

INDIA

Rose Festival. 40th Year and still going strong.

Rose Festival, Chandigarh is held in the famous Rose Garden at Chandigarh. This is largest Rose Show in the country. This festival is celebrated in the Rose Garden every year in the end of the month of February or during the first few days of March. The festival is organized to encourage the people to enjoy the bloom of different type of roses here

As Chandigarh’s Rose Festival this week enters its 40th year, residents throng in large numbers.

The star attractions are the millions of roses themselves, but there is also a host of activities, including competitions and cultural shows, at the festival being held at Rose Garden in upscale Sector 16 here from Feb 24 to 26.

Children would be crowned “Rose Prince” and “Rose Princess” and there will be painting and flower contests. Commercial and food stalls will be set up in the adjoining Leisure Valley in Sector 10.

In recent years, the footfall at the festival has crossed over 300,000, officials here said.

The Rose Garden has nearly 40,000 rose plants of over 800 rose species from all over the world.

The garden was set up in 1967 and was essentially the brainchild of Chandigarh’s first chief commissioner and keen horticulturist M.S. Randhawa – a man credited for giving the city millions of trees and a number of gardens and green belts.

The authorities here claim the Rose Garden, spread over nearly 30 acres, is the largest in Asia. Along with the roses, the garden also hosts trees of medicinal value.

“The Rose Festival is an important event for Chandigarh. Though the city itself is young, different generations of families have been coming in the last four decades to be part of it,” former councillor Chander Mukhi Sharma said .

The Rose Garden has been divided into 10 sections. These sections are not only for roses but also for a children’s play area, scrubs, medicinal plants, a hillock and musical fountains.

Some of the roses at the garden have been named after international and other personalities – from Britain’s Queen Elizabeth and former US president John F. Kennedy to former prime minister Lal Bahadur Shastri and M.S. Randhawa.

Some of the unusual names given to the rose varieties are: Only You, Dulhan, King’s Ransom, Hippie Girl, Love Me Tender, Careless Love, Lover’s Meeting, Delhi Prince, Oklahoma, American Heritage, Louisiana, Canadian Centenary, City of Belfast, Wild Plum and Dorothy Peach.

“We have to take care of the roses so that they are in full bloom when the festival comes. This year the winters have been excessively cold,” said Subhash, a gardener.

For a few years the name of the festival was changed to Festival of Gardens by the local administration. However, for common people, it has always remained the Rose Festival.

Hundreds of people from Punjab, Haryana and Himachal Pradesh visit the city for the annual festival. They come here packed in buses, trucks and even tractor-trolleys. The festival also attracts people from other parts of the country and foreigners.

Chandigarh, which was planned and designed by French architect Le Corbusier and his team in the 1950s-60s as a symbol of a resurgent, independent India, has a total population of over one million.

Details of all our roses are available on our web site. Over 1000 varieties to choose from.

www.countrygardenroses.co.uk

 

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