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Tag: Hybrid


Journal of a rose gardener…Focus on Hybrid Teas (10/08/16)

Focus on Hybrid Teas...What are they? Where did they come from? When does it flower? 

Find out now here... 

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Feb 20 • 2013 • GardenHybridRememberRoseRose of the WeekScentedTeabloomsfloweringfoliageplant

ROSE OF THE WEEK

REMEMBER

Hybrid Tea Rose    1994   3ft-4ft

A lovely addition to our HT section.

Classic shapely medium sized  blooms of  light pink, an extremely attractive and free flowering hybrid tea.

A bushy plant with young reddish foliage that matures to glossy dark green.

A very healthy and disease free rose which makes a real statement in the garden.  Can also be grown in a large container.

As with most Hts will thrive in full sun.

Highly Scented.

A lovely rose to plant as a memorial rose.

Used to be known as Royal Copenhagen.

RELATED TITLES

Remember Me.   Remembrance.    Liverpool Remembers.   Absent Friends.   Fond Memories.   Happy Memories.   Loving Memory.   Never Forgotten.   Peace.   Sweet Memories.

Details of all our roses are available on our web site. Over 1000 varieties to choose from.

www.countrygardenroses.co.uk

 

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Jan 30 • 2013 • AlbasBourbonsChinasDamasksFAQFloribundasHybridMossMusksPortlandsshrubtypes

FAQ Frequently Asked Questions.

OFFICINALIS (Shrub Rose)

Q. What is meant by the term “Shrub Rose” A. SHRUB ROSES are often defined as roses that do not fit into any of the other classifications of rose types such as Hybrid Teas Floribundas etc. They are a “mixed bag” of roses that differ greatly in size and colour. Shrub roses tend to be hardier than other rose types and can be grown as specimens in the garden, in groups, or many make ideal flowering hedges. Most shrub roses are scented, fairly disease resistant and require very little maintenance. They are a mixture of wild species, old garden roses from around the world and hybrids developed in recent years. VARIETIES OF SHRUB ROSES. (Albas) Very old roses which are summer flowering, mostly scented and disease resistant. Example Alba Semi Plena. (Bourbons) Emerged in the mid-nineteenth century and were very popular in Victorian times. Very diverse in habit and colour. Repeat flowering. Example. La Reine Victoria. (Centifolias) Centuries old “roses of the hundred petals” They produce large scented flowers of exquisite shape. Example. Fantin Latour (Chinas) First appeared in the mid-eighteenth century. Long flowering season, healthy shiny foliage and usually very liable. Example. Gruss An Aachen. (Damasks) Some of this group date back to roman times. Very healthy, distinct Damask perfume and very beautiful. Example. Madame Hardy. (Portlands) Some of the finest and useful of old roses. Many are not very big and can be grown in pots or containers. Continuous flowering or repeat flowering. Ideal for bedding or hedges . Example. Rose de Rescht. (Gallicas) Some of the oldest cultivated roses are in this group. A compact scented rose in various colours from purple-maroon to pink. Example. Charles de Mills. (Hybrid Perpetuals) The most popular group of roses in Victorian Times. Very diverse in flowering habit and size. Most repeat flower in autumn. Examples. . Ferdinand Pichard. Hugh Dickson.    (Modern Shrub Roses) Many families of roses have contributed to the modern rose varieties. Hybrid Teas, Floribundas etc. Examples. Blue Moon. Champagne Moment. (Moss Roses) An unusual but attractive group with mossed buds and stems. They vary in height and colour and are mostly scented. Example. William Lobb. (Hybrid Musks) A useful group that evolved in the early 20th century. Healthy and free flowering and the blooms are produced in large clusters. Scented. Ideal for hedging, specimen or group planting. Example. Buff Beauty. (Rugosas) See Rugosa pages on main menu. (Noisettes) A very beautiful range of climbers which are highly scented and free flowering. Example. Blush Noisette. (Species Roses) The original dog roses which have grown in the wild for thousands of years. Example. Rosa Rubrifolia. (English Roses) David Austin. A modern shrub rose which has retained the old fashioned look plus a repeat flowering habit. A very beautiful range and most of the range are highly perfumed. For further details please SHRUB ROSES on  our web site.

Details of all our roses are available on our web site. Over 1000 varieties to choose from. (click below)

www.countrygardenroses.co.uk

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Dec 17 • 2012 • DadGrandadGrandmaMumNew Roses For 2012Patiofloribundahybrid tea

NEW ROSES FOR 2013

SPECIAL DAD

Hybrid Tea

A set of new roses for our Special Occasion section.

Classic Hybrid Tea blooms of deep red on this elegant new rose.

Good long flowering period from early summer until the first frosts.

Healthy foliage with good disease resistance.

Will grow in the garden or a large container.

Dead head regularly to promote faster re-blooming and keep it tidy.

Makes a great gift and Dad will love this excellent new rose.

Scented.

SPECIAL MUM

Floribunda

A cracking little Floribunda and a great way to spoil a "Special Mum"

Masses of attractive medium pink blooms from early summer right through to the autumn. 

A healthy and easy to grow variety to suit the garden or a container.

Plenty of blooms, and ideal for cutting as they look great in a vase with the added bonus of a good perfume.

Dead head regularly through the summer which will speed up the re-blooming and will help to keep the bush tidy and attractive.

SPECIAL GRANDMA

Patio Rose

A very pretty little Patio rose with an abundance of pink blend blooms all summer long. 

A healthy and easy to grow variety with good disease resistance.

Makes a great little bedding rose which will brighten up the garden.

Also does well in a container and would look great on a patio or either side of the front door.

Dead head regulary through the summer which will speed up the re-blooming and keep it tidy.

A lovely gift for a "Special Grandma" Scented

SPECIAL GRANDAD

Patio Rose

A neat compact little rose with masses of bright red blooms from early summer through until autumn.

Healthy foliage with excellent disease resistance.

Makes a bright and cheery bedding rose which will brighten up any garden, or will be quite happy in a container.

Dead head regularly to speed up re-blooming and to keep the bush tidy.

A great gift for a "Special Grandad"

Scented.

Details of all our roses are available on our web site. Over 1000 varieties to choose from. (click below)

www.countrygardenroses.co.uk

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Sep 06 • 2012 • HybridNew Roses For 2013QualityRecommendedRoseSizeTeablooms

NEW ROSES FOR 2013

PERCEPTION

Hybrid Tea  3ft-5ft  1997

Plenty of blooms on this superb hybrid tea rose.

Exhibition quality blooms of cream edged with cerise throughout the season.

Selected and named on behalf of Britain's Royal National Institute For The Blind.

For sheer quality and size this one takes some beating.

 Highly Recommended.

 Wonderful Fragrance.

 Also known as 'Cindy'

Details of all our roses are available on our web site. Over 1000 varieties to choose from.

www.countrygardenroses.co.uk

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Aug 29 • 2012 • ColourFlowersHybridNew Roses For 2013Rosebrightbushyshrub

NEW ROSES FOR 2013

BRIGHT AS A BUTTON

Shrub Rose  2012.  3ft Produces an eyecatching display of cascading colour, this lovely Persica hybrid blooms freely with small pretty pink flowers with red and gold centres, nice easily managed bushy growth with exceptionally high disease resistance associated with the Persica’s.    Scented.

Available from November 2012

Details of all our roses are available on our web site. Over 1000 varieties to choose from.

www.countrygardenroses.co.uk

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Aug 25 • 2012 • FlowersGlossyGrowingGrowthHybridLeavesNew Roses For 2013Scentedplant

NEW ROSES FOR 2013

ALWAYS REMEMBER ME

Hybrid Tea Rose 3ft

The flowers of this hybrid tea are a soft peachy apricot, lightly scented and produced singly. Leaves are glossy and large and new growth is a bright copper red. Habit is upright. Rosa Always Remember Me is a medium growing plant reaching about 3 feet (100cms). Do you remember PC Bill Barker? His name is synonymous with the Cumbrian floods of 2009 when he was swept away from a collapsing bridge in Workington when ensuring the safety of others. His family and the community will never forget the courage of a people’s hero. And in years to come, a new rose called “Always Remember Me�? will blossom in memory of PC Barker’s steadfast nature. Sales of the rose will benefit the Air Rescue, an important charity nominated by PC Barker.

Available from Country Garden Roses from December 2012.

Details of all our roses are available on our web site.

Over 1000 varieties to choose from.

www.countrygardenroses.co.uk

 

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Apr 15 • 2012 • BudHybridRose TipsTeafloribundaplantsroses

ROSE TIPS

CHANDOS BEAUTY 

ROSE TIPS

Create bigger roses:

When buds on hybrid tea roses appear, save the lead bud and remove the side buds for larger roses. Remove them early or you'll get smaller roses. Do the opposite with floribundas; remove the center bud so the side buds can size up for larger bouquets.

Details of all our roses are available on our web site. Over 1000 varieties to choose from.

www.countrygardenroses.co.uk

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Mar 11 • 2012 • BushesFlowersHybridRose Newsgardenersnurseryroses

ROSE NEWS FROM AROUND THE WORLD

USA

ROSE INDUSTRY NOT LOOKING GOOD IN THE STATES

BELOVED 

For a century, devoted gardeners have appreciated the marvels of delicate and finicky hybrid roses and referred to them by name, like pets or family. The product of generations of breeding, the queen of flowers could act like a spoiled princess because its delicate blooms offered a special reward.

In recent years, though, time-strapped homeowners have traded their big teas for compact shrub roses — utilitarian soldiers in the landscape that could cover ground without fuss. Our desire for the carefree — no-iron shirts, no-wax floors, and now low-maintenance yards — has brought the rose industry to a crossroads. "At some point, it becomes a self-fulfilling prophecy," said Charlie Anderson, president of Weeks Roses, the only major company still creating new varieties of full-size roses. "[Landscape] roses will be all you have; the beautiful, unique hybrid teas will be gone." The flagging economy has compounded the rose industry's troubles. Two years ago, rose giant Jackson & Perkins, which had annually shipped 10 million bushes nationwide, filed for bankruptcy protection. Many of the hybrid roses the company created — such as Diana, Catalina and Beloved — may soon disappear from the mass market as the supply of those bushes dries up. "Roses are viewed as an extravagance, and they're still trying to shed that stigma," said Seth Taylor of Capital Nursery. "People have a very specific thing in mind when they think of a rose — it's full and lush and romantic. That's your traditional rose, what people love," Taylor said. "The single-petaled shrub roses are gaining a foothold with the public, but when my customers look at those flowers, they say, 'That's not a rose.'" While gardeners may have visions of old-fashioned roses plucked from cottage gardens, their interest in growing them has waned, said Jolene Adams, incoming national president of the American Rose Society. "Many homeowners have had some experience — usually in their mother's or grandmother's gardens — so they'll try growing roses," she said. "But without sufficient knowledge [on how to care for them], the roses languish and do not grow to their full, beautiful potential. And they're not replaced if they die." Most of the nation's rosebushes originate in California's Central Valley. But unlike with wheat or tomatoes, it takes several years to produce a single crop of rosebushes. Hybridizers typically will test 400,000 seedlings to find one or two new varieties. Once selected, a new hybrid will be developed for seven to 10 years before it's released into the market. When ready for sale, field-grown bushes are 2 years old. Winter is prime rose-planting time. But this month, local gardeners are finding limited selections at nurseries and home centers. "I observed dramatically fewer roses in the nurseries this year," said T.J. David, co-founder of the World Peace Rose Garden in Sacramento's Capitol Park. "The financial ills of the rose growers will cause a slowdown in the number of new varieties of roses that are available for sale," he said. "Since growers make plans years in advance, it may take a year or two to see the full impact." The annual wholesale value of California's rose crop dropped 55% to $27.20 million in 2010 from a high of $61.05 million in 2003, according to nursery industry expert Hoy Carman, a retired UC Davis professor. "The whole nursery industry is down," Carman said. "In 2008, sales just plummeted." Said Adams of the Rose Society: "Roses are not the first thing homeowners think of when they want to plant a garden. Competition with other choice plants is fierce.... The industry is going to have to change — and supply roses that the customers can use in the landscape." Most major rose growers have gone bankrupt or consolidated with other wholesale nurseries. Weeks Roses, in Wasco near Bakersfield, survived its bankruptcy and is now owned by Indiana-based Gardens Alive Inc. On 1,000 leased acres, Weeks will harvest about 3 million bushes this year. During grafting and harvest season, it employs almost 400 people. Jackson & Perkins, acquired by J&P Park Acquisitions Inc. of South Carolina, no longer develops and grows new roses. Before bankruptcy, the company farmed 5,000 acres in Wasco with 20,000 bushes per acre. Without buyers, many of those bushes were burned. Once a breeder goes bankrupt, its roses usually disappear with it. Rose patents — good for 18 to 20 years — may be sold, but budwood and mother plants are lost. Many Jackson & Perkins roses are now on the endangered list. "Some will be preserved," Anderson said. "But a lot of varieties were lost; there was no budwood to collect [to create new hybrid bushes]. Most will just disappear into the ether."

Details of all our roses are available on our web site. Over 1000 varieties to choose from.

www.countrygardenroses.co.uk

 

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Feb 14 • 2012 • BushesFlowersHybrid RosesNew Roses For 2012Princess Of Walesbloomsgardeners

ROSE NEWS FROM AROUND THE WORLD

USA

THE FUTURE DOES NOT LOOK ROSY

PRINCESS OF WALES

Future generations may never know the beauty of Diana, Princess of Wales; sniff Catalina in the sunshine; or fall for Beloved. For a century, devoted gardeners have appreciated the marvels of delicate and finicky hybrid roses and referred to them by name, like pets or family. The product of generations of breeding, the queen of flowers could act like a spoiled princess because its delicate blooms offered a special reward. In recent years, though, time-strapped homeowners have traded their big teas for compact shrub roses—utilitarian soldiers in the landscape that could cover ground without fuss. Our desire for the carefree—no-iron shirts, no-wax floors, and now low-maintenance yards—has brought the rose industry to a crossroads. “At some point, it becomes a self-fulfilling prophecy. (Landscape) roses will be all you have; the beautiful, unique hybrid teas will be gone,” said Charlie Anderson, president of Weeks Roses, the only major company still creating new varieties of full-size roses. The flagging economy has compounded the rose industry’s troubles. Two years ago, rose giant Jackson & Perkins, which had annually shipped 10 million bushes countrywide, filed for bankruptcy protection. Many of the hybrid roses the company created—such as Diana, Catalina and Beloved—may soon disappear from the mass market as the supply of those bushes dries up. “Roses are viewed as an extravagance and they’re still trying to shed that stigma,” said Seth Taylor of Capital Nursery. “People have a very specific thing in mind when they think of a rose—it’s full and lush and romantic. That’s your traditional rose, what people love,” Taylor said. “The single-petaled shrub roses are gaining a foothold with the public, but when my customers look at those flowers, they say ‘That’s not a rose.’ “ While gardeners may have visions of old-fashioned roses plucked from cottage gardens, their interest in growing them has waned, said Jolene Adams, incoming national president of the American Rose Society. “Many homeowners have had some experience—usually in their mother’s or grandmother’s gardens—so they’ll try growing roses,” she said. “But without sufficient knowledge (on how to care for them), the roses languish and do not grow to their full, beautiful potential. And they’re not replaced if they die.” Most of the United States’ rose bushes originate in California’s Central Valley. But unlike wheat or tomatoes, it takes several years to produce a single crop of rose bushes. Hybridizers typically will test 400,000 seedlings to find one or two new varieties. Once selected, a new hybrid will be developed for seven to 10 years before it’s released into the market. When ready for sale, field-grown bushes are 2 years old. Winter is prime rose-planting time. Valentine’s Day also spurs sales. But this month, local gardeners are finding limited selections at nurseries and home centers. “I observed dramatically fewer roses in the nurseries this year,” said T.J. David, co-founder of the World Peace Rose Garden in Sacramento’s Capitol Park. “The financial ills of the rose growers will cause a slowdown in the number of new varieties of roses that are available for sale,” he said. “Since growers make plans years in advance, it may take a year or two to see the full impact.” The annual wholesale value of California’s rose crop dropped 55 percent from a high of $61.05 million in 2003 to $27.20 million in 2010, according to nursery industry expert Hoy Carman, a retired University of California-Davis professor. “The whole nursery industry is down,” Carman said. “In 2008, sales just plummeted.” Said Adams of the Rose Society: “Roses are not the first thing homeowners think of when they want to plant a garden. Competition with other choice plants is fierce. ... The industry is going to have to change—and supply roses that the customers can use in the landscape.” Most major rose growers have gone bankrupt or consolidated with other wholesale nurseries. Weeks Roses, in Wasco near Bakersfield, Calif., survived its bankruptcy and is now owned by Indiana-based Gardens Alive. On 1,000 leased acres, Weeks will harvest about 3 million bushes this year. During grafting and harvest season, it employs almost 400 people. Jackson & Perkins, acquired by South Carolina-based J&P Park Acquisitions, no longer develops and grows new roses. Before bankruptcy, the company farmed 5,000 acres in Wasco with 20,000 bushes per acre. Without buyers, many of those bushes were burned. Once a breeder goes bankrupt, its roses usually disappear with it. Rose patents—good for 18 to 20 years—may be sold, but budwood and mother plants are lost. Many Jackson & Perkins roses are now on the endangered list. “Some will be preserved,” Anderson said. “But a lot of varieties were lost; there was no budwood to collect (to create new hybrid bushes). Most will just disappear into the ether.”

Details of all our roses are available on our web site. Over 1000 varieties to choose from.

www.countrygardenroses.co.uk

 

READ MORE >

 

Jan 22 • 2012 • HipsHybridMuskRose Facts & TriviaRosettebloomsfloweringfoliageperfume

THE VICAR’S DAUGHTERS COLLECTION

Three beautiful roses bred by the Rev Joseph Pemberton

And named after his daughter’s.

 FELICIA

Delicate soft pink and cream blooms fading to almost white. Flowering is most prolific in the spring, but is a little less so in summer.   However the late summer and autumn show is quite something as the flowers are borne in huge panicles bearing the most highly coloured and longest lasting flowers of the year.  If the spent flowers are not removed, large round red hips are produced which look most attractive among the autumn flowers. Good strong disease resistant foliage. Can really brighten up a  dull autumn day. Shade tolerant and makes a good hedge Excellent Perfume.

National Rose Society Certificate of Merit 1927 Royal Horticultural Society Award Of Garden Merit  1993 Bred by th Rev Joseph Pemberton and named after one of his daughters.

CORNELIA

This lovely old rose has been around a while but is just as popular as ever. A hybrid musk rose with the usual free flowering associated with this species of rose. The lovely rosette flowers are a rich apricot flushed pink and are borne in large arching trusses continually from summer to autumn.  A superb strong growing shrub with very few thorns plus good dark green bronze glossy foliage. Completely hardy but does best in a sunny spot out of the wind. Can be grown in the garden or large container, is shade tolerant and will cope with poorer soils. Distinct Musk Fragrance.

 Royal Horticultural Society Award Of Garden Merit 1993

Bred by the Rev Joseph Pemberton and named after one of his daughters.

 PENELOPE

This is a large, arching shrub with vigorous and disease free growth. It flowers continuously through summer and into autumn and produces a lovely show of hips in winter. The trusses of double, medium sized blooms are of a delicate light pink and apricot shades fading to white with age. 'Penelope' makes a fine specimen rose in the garden or an effective informal hedge, and is useful for growing over walls or fences and will cope with partial shade. The blooms are sweetly scented.

Details of all our roses are available on our web site. Over 1000 varieties to choose from.

www.countrygardenroses.co.uk

 

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NEW ROSES FOR 2012

ALWAYS REMEMBER ME 

Hybrid Tea.  2011.  3ft-4ft

A stunning new Hybrid Tea rose with large blooms of apricot and pink blends. The good strong stems and scented blooms make superb cut flowers. The attractive new foliage is a lovely shiny red which changes to dark green as the foliage matures.

Bred in New Zealand by Sam McGredy and was the last rose he bred before he retired.

An award winning rose that was  made "Rose Of The Year" in New Zealand. A donation from each retail sale will go to the Great North Air Ambulance Service.

Regret limited stocks this year so no bare root roses available. Potted Gift Rose Only.

Details of all our roses are available on our web site. Over 1000 varieties to choose from.

www.countrygardenroses.co.uk

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Nov 15 • 2011 • AnniversaryAwardCitrusFragranceMaroonNew Roses For 2012Summerhybrid teaperfume

NEW ROSES FOR 2012

THE ANNIVERSARY ROSE 

Hybrid Tea.  2006.  3ft-4ft.

An award winning Hybrid Tea of infinite charm which produces masses of large dusky plum pink blooms throughout the summer. Healthy grey green maroon foliage shows the huge blooms off to perfection. Strong citrus fragrance. A superb rose for any anniversary.

Bred by Meilland in France 2006.  Introduced into the UK 2008. Also known as 'Forget-Me-Not' AWARDS Australian National Rose Trials. Most Fragrant Rose. Australian National Rose Trials. Silver Medal. Orleans National Rose Trials. Perfume prize. Hradec Králové Rose Trials. Golden Rose. Nantes Rose Trials. First Grand Prize. Le Roeulx Rose Trials. Certificatye Of Merit. Le Roeuix Rose Trials. Fragrance Award. GOLD STANDARD AWARD WINNER 2009

Details of all our roses are available on our web site.

Over 1000 varieties to choose from.

www.countrygardenroses.co.uk

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Aug 05 • 2011 • Rose Newsblush noisette.noisetteclimbingfloribundahybrid teapatio rose

ROSE NEWS FROM AROUND THE WORLD

NORTH AMERICA

BLUSH NOISETTE

200 Years Of Noisette Roses

The 200th Anniversary Celebration of the Noisette rose is to be held in the City of Orangeburg’s Edisto Memorial Gardens on August 20th, 2011. The event will take place in the Fine Arts Building, 649 Riverside Drive starting at 10:30 am.

This event will the highlight the only class of roses ever created in North America and specifically South Carolina. The Noisettes were created on a rice plantation just out of Charleston in 1811 by John Champney. By the friendship of Philippe Noisette, the rose traveled to Europe and played a significant role in what is now known as the “modern roses”.

August 20th. will be marked by speakers familiar with the Noisette rose. These speakers are known nationally and internationally for their work with the rose. Also, potted Noisette roses will be available for sale to the public. A garden tour will be held at the end of the talks.

There will be a keynote speaker that day. That speaker is Mrs. Peggy Clement of Charleston and a direct descendant of Philippe Noisette. Mrs. Clement will speak about her family’s history and have a two week exhibit in the Fine Arts Building. It is hoped that she will be able to bring relatives from France and Haiti when she comes on the 20th.

So, plan to attend this historical and interesting event.

This event is open to the public and free admission. For more information contact Jay Hiers 803-533-5870 or [email protected]

MME ALFRED CARRIERE

CREPUSCULE

For details of all our current roses, see our extensive web site.

Over 1000 varieties to choose from

www.countrygardenroses.co.uk

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