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Feb 26 • 2013 • EdricEmmaEnglishFAQFruityGertrudeHamiltonJekyllJudeObscurefragrant

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

JUDE THE OBSCURE

Q: Which is the most fragrant English Rose? A: Jude the Obscure is probably the most fragrant although it does depend on the day and your individual response to scent. It is certainly the variety that seems to delight most people. It has the most wonderful fruity fragrance which is often strongly citrus and sometimes distinctly guava, lychee or sweet white wine. Other contenders for the title include Gertrude Jekyll (a perfectly balanced old rose fragrance), Lady Emma Hamilton (a deliciously fruity fragrance), Wild Edric (a blend of old rose and clove) and Jubilee Celebration (another lovely fruity fragrance).

Details of all our roses are available on our web site. Over 1000 varieties to choose from. (click below)

www.countrygardenroses.co.uk

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Feb 18 • 2013 • Bud.LeafletsBushFAQHealRootstockShootsSuckerplant

Frequently Asked Questions

   

Q. What is a rose sucker?

A. Suckers are shoots that grow from the rootstock rather than from the named variety which has been grafted onto it. If nothing is done then the suckers will take over the plant completely and you will have a bush that has reverted back to the root stock.

You can tell if it is a sucker if you see that it is coming from below the bud union and by the different leaf form and colour.   Suckers can appear anywhere from the bud union downwards.  Any growth above the bud union is new growth and NOT a sucker.

Don't go by the number of leaflets as a guide as that is a bit off an old wives tale.

Try to pull or break the sucker off at the base rather than cutting it, as cutting stimulates growth again. Pulling it or breaking it off at the base causes the wound to make a callous and heal over.

Details of all our roses are available on our web site. Over 1000 varieties to choose from. (click below)

www.countrygardenroses.co.uk

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Feb 10 • 2013 • BalckBushDeeplyDideaseHumidityDryFAQGardenMildewRainfallRoot.GrowthSpotWaters

FAQ Frequently Asked Questions

 

Q. How often should I water my roses ?

  1. A.      Nothing is more important for a rose bush's survival and performance than water. Roses absolutely love water.
  • In general, soil for roses should be watered  deeply, but infrequently. This will encourage strong root growth. Even      during winter, occasional watering of garden roses during dry periods will help them perform better during the next growing season.
  • Water in the morning to help prevent black spot and mildew.
  • Avoid wetting the plant's leaves during regular watering, which can spread disease.
  • However, about once a week, give your rose a "shower" with a spray nozzle hose attachment. This treatment not only adds water and humidity, it clears leaves of dust, dirt etc. or other harmful insects. Never sprinkle bushes in the afternoon or evening, which can promote disease.
  • Roses should receive 1 to 2 inches of water each week. Rule of thumb is to water two to four times a week, especially if there is no rainfall, or in very hot or windy conditions.
  • Container roses will need to be watered frequently because water evaporates more quickly from plants above ground.      Initially, water the plant well to get it firmly established.
  • During growth cycles, stick a finger in the soil to check for moisture. If your finger comes out literally dry, it's time to add water. Muddy soil means the plant is getting too much water.      Moist soil should be an indicator that the water amount is just about right.

Mulch (2 to 3 inches around a bush) to help retain moisture from watering and reduce future watering needs. Mulching also helps keep the soil cool and helps control weeds. Details of all our roses are available on our web site. Over 1000 varieties to choose from. (click below)

www.countrygardenroses.co.uk

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Feb 04 • 2013 • AwardBeautifulBreedersFAQQualityStandardTrialsVarietygold

FAQ Frequently Asked Questions.

YOU'RE BEAUTIFUL

Gold Standard Rose

Q. What is a Gold Standard Rose ? A. The Gold Standard Award Roses are the best guide to the quality of all roses on the market. The Gold Standard Trials are a result of a joint initiative between professional rose breeders represented by BARB (British Association of Rose Breeders and NIAB (National Institute of Agricultural Botany) Unlike some other rose trials, breeders pay a fee for each rose variety submitted to the trials, independently managed by NIAB at their Cambridge headquarters. Based on cumulative information from invited independent judges throughout the two year period of the trial, the Gold Standard is awarded to worthy varieties. Health, floriferousness, scent and commercial appeal are all considered key factors. If you are new to roses we would advise you to choose Gold Standard Rose Varieties for the best results.  . We stock as many Gold Standard varieties as possible and add all the new varieties to our list  as they come on the market.  

Details of all our roses are available on our web site. Over 1000 varieties to choose from. (click below) www.countrygardenroses.co.uk

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Jan 30 • 2013 • AlbasBourbonsChinasDamasksFAQFloribundasHybridMossMusksPortlandsshrubtypes

FAQ Frequently Asked Questions.

OFFICINALIS (Shrub Rose)

Q. What is meant by the term “Shrub Rose” A. SHRUB ROSES are often defined as roses that do not fit into any of the other classifications of rose types such as Hybrid Teas Floribundas etc. They are a “mixed bag” of roses that differ greatly in size and colour. Shrub roses tend to be hardier than other rose types and can be grown as specimens in the garden, in groups, or many make ideal flowering hedges. Most shrub roses are scented, fairly disease resistant and require very little maintenance. They are a mixture of wild species, old garden roses from around the world and hybrids developed in recent years. VARIETIES OF SHRUB ROSES. (Albas) Very old roses which are summer flowering, mostly scented and disease resistant. Example Alba Semi Plena. (Bourbons) Emerged in the mid-nineteenth century and were very popular in Victorian times. Very diverse in habit and colour. Repeat flowering. Example. La Reine Victoria. (Centifolias) Centuries old “roses of the hundred petals” They produce large scented flowers of exquisite shape. Example. Fantin Latour (Chinas) First appeared in the mid-eighteenth century. Long flowering season, healthy shiny foliage and usually very liable. Example. Gruss An Aachen. (Damasks) Some of this group date back to roman times. Very healthy, distinct Damask perfume and very beautiful. Example. Madame Hardy. (Portlands) Some of the finest and useful of old roses. Many are not very big and can be grown in pots or containers. Continuous flowering or repeat flowering. Ideal for bedding or hedges . Example. Rose de Rescht. (Gallicas) Some of the oldest cultivated roses are in this group. A compact scented rose in various colours from purple-maroon to pink. Example. Charles de Mills. (Hybrid Perpetuals) The most popular group of roses in Victorian Times. Very diverse in flowering habit and size. Most repeat flower in autumn. Examples. . Ferdinand Pichard. Hugh Dickson.    (Modern Shrub Roses) Many families of roses have contributed to the modern rose varieties. Hybrid Teas, Floribundas etc. Examples. Blue Moon. Champagne Moment. (Moss Roses) An unusual but attractive group with mossed buds and stems. They vary in height and colour and are mostly scented. Example. William Lobb. (Hybrid Musks) A useful group that evolved in the early 20th century. Healthy and free flowering and the blooms are produced in large clusters. Scented. Ideal for hedging, specimen or group planting. Example. Buff Beauty. (Rugosas) See Rugosa pages on main menu. (Noisettes) A very beautiful range of climbers which are highly scented and free flowering. Example. Blush Noisette. (Species Roses) The original dog roses which have grown in the wild for thousands of years. Example. Rosa Rubrifolia. (English Roses) David Austin. A modern shrub rose which has retained the old fashioned look plus a repeat flowering habit. A very beautiful range and most of the range are highly perfumed. For further details please SHRUB ROSES on  our web site.

Details of all our roses are available on our web site. Over 1000 varieties to choose from. (click below)

www.countrygardenroses.co.uk

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Jan 28 • 2013 • BestBreedersClimateFAQSelectionTrialsVarietiesYear

FAQ Frequently Asked Questions.

YOU'RE BEAUTIFUL Rose Of The Year 2013

Q. Who decides which rose is named “Rose Of The Year” A.  Rose Of The Year® was introduced in 1982 and its aim is to discover by trials the best rose(s) in any given year. Rose breeders are invited, through Roses UK, to enter what they consider to be the best of their up and coming varieties in to the Rose of the Year competition; generally up to 20 varieties are submitted annually. Trials are conducted throughout the UK from as far north as Aberdeen, to Hampshire in the South, Northern Ireland and East Anglia with the varieties trialled in different soil and climate conditions. The trial lasts for a two year period and is judged by both amateurs and professional with the most worthy variety being selected as Rose Of The Year®. Selection is some 6 years in advance of its availability to allow for the building up of sufficient stock levels for its introduction to the public. The latest half dozen are Rose Of The Year 2013 “You’re Beautiful”   2012 “Moment In Time” 2011 “Joie De Vivre”  2010 “Absolutely Fabulous”   2009 “Lucky” For more details please see  ROSE OF THE YEAR page on our web site.

Details of all our roses are available on our web site. Over 1000 varieties to choose from. (click below)

www.countrygardenroses.co.uk

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Jan 25 • 2013 • FAQFairyFlowerHillsLucyMalvernPhylissRamblerSummerclimbingfloweringrepeat

FAQ Frequently Asked Questions.

MALVERN HILLS Repeat Flowering Rambler.

Q. What is the difference between a Climbing rose and a Rambling rose.

A.      In the past the answer was quite simple.  Most ramblers only flower once during the summer, mainly in the spring or early summer.   Most climbers repeat flower through the summer. However over the last few years quite a few ramblers have been bred that repeat flower through the season.  Take a look at our Rambling Rose section on the web site which lists quite a few repeat flowering ramblers.   A few that come to mind are BLUSHING LUCY.  MALVERN HILLS. PHYLISS BIDE. And SUPER FAIRY.  For further information please see the ROSE CARE page on our web site.

 

 Details of all our roses are available on our web site. Over 1000 varieties to choose from. (click below)

www.countrygardenroses.co.uk

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Jan 22 • 2013 • ChandosDelightDoubleFAQFirefighterHighlyPerfumedperfume

FAQ. Frequently Asked Questions.

CHANDOS BEAUTY

Q, I would like to fill my garden with highly perfumed roses.  Which varieties do you recommend. A. The choice of highly perfumed roses is immense.  Unfortunately it is one of the areas that cause the most arguments.  What one person describes as highly perfumed, another person will disagree and describe the perfume as mild.    Roses have one of the most complex, widely ranging perfumes of all flowers. The weather conditions on the day before the rose opens, the age of the flower, the season and even the time of day all influence the fragrance of an individual bloom. On our web site we have listed all the roses which we stock and are generally described as highly perfumed.  See Highly Perfumed Roses on the main menu. The varieties we can recommend are as follows. CHANDOS BEAUTY. DOUBLE DELIGHT. FIREFIGHTER. GERTRUDE JEKYLL. JUDE THE OBSCURE. MUNSTEAD WOOD. PAPA MEILLAND. SPECIAL ANNIVERSARY. THE ANNIVERSARY ROSE and WOLLERTON OLD HALL.  

Details of all our roses are available on our web site. Over 1000 varieties to choose from. (click below)

www.countrygardenroses.co.uk

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Jan 20 • 2013 • ClimberDrouhinFAQPatioThornlessWarmWecome.Zepherine

FAQ Frequently Asked Questions.

Thornless Rose ZEPHERINE DROUHIN

Q. Can you tell me which roses are thornless ? A. There are very few thornless roses.  Two varieties that are thornless are the David Austin Shrub Rose KEW GARDEN and the climber ZEPHERINE DROUHIN.  There are quite a lot of almost thornless roses available. Please see the “What Rose Where” section on our web site.

Patio Climber WARM WELCOME

Q. Can I grow a climbing rose in a pot. A. Most climbing roses will grow too big and tall for a pot .  However there are quite a few small modern climbers that can be grown successfully in a large pot.   They are sold now under the title of Patio Climbers or Courtyard Climbers and bred to survive in a pot or container.  Please browse our web site under PATIO CLIMBERS and you will find numerous varieties which will fit the bill.

Details of all our roses are available on our web site. Over 1000 varieties to choose from. (click below)

www.countrygardenroses.co.uk

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