There may be delays in some areas due to courier staff and drivers isolatiing.
PL1-PL35 postcodes are experiencing delays.
Menu British Grown

Tag: English


May 15 • 2013 • EnglishFlowersPink.CuppedPrunedRose of the Weekbloomsbushyclustersseasonshrub

Rose Of The Week

ENGLAND'S ROSE

English Shrub rose 2010   4ft

A new English rose which is a particularly tough and reliable variety of medium size, with flowers of deep glowing pink.  They are shallowly cupped at first; the outer petals eventually reflexing back and revealing an attractive button eye.

'England's Rose' flowers more or less continually from June right through until the end of the season, in October or even November.

The blooms are nicely held in large clusters.   This is a healthy weather resistant rose, even in periods of continual rain the blooms do not ball and the petals drop cleanly.

It will form an attractive, bushy shrub of about 4ft in height and 3ft across, although it could easily grow taller if pruned lightly.

An ideal variety for planting in a rose border or for mixing with perennials.

The fragrance is particularly fine; strong warm and spicy with a classic Old Rose character.

 

Essential reading for all English Rose enthusiasts.

‘The English Roses’ by David Austin.

Please go to  GARDENERS GIFT SHOP on the main Menu.

Details of all our roses are available on our web site. Over 1000 varieties to choose from.

www.countrygardenroses.co.uk

 

READ MORE >

 

Feb 26 • 2013 • EdricEmmaEnglishFAQFruityGertrudeHamiltonJekyllJudeObscurefragrant

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

JUDE THE OBSCURE

Q: Which is the most fragrant English Rose? A: Jude the Obscure is probably the most fragrant although it does depend on the day and your individual response to scent. It is certainly the variety that seems to delight most people. It has the most wonderful fruity fragrance which is often strongly citrus and sometimes distinctly guava, lychee or sweet white wine. Other contenders for the title include Gertrude Jekyll (a perfectly balanced old rose fragrance), Lady Emma Hamilton (a deliciously fruity fragrance), Wild Edric (a blend of old rose and clove) and Jubilee Celebration (another lovely fruity fragrance).

Details of all our roses are available on our web site. Over 1000 varieties to choose from. (click below)

www.countrygardenroses.co.uk

READ MORE >

 

Feb 25 • 2013 • EnglishFlowersGardenRoseRose GardensScentsSummerperfume

ROSE GARDENS

LEVENS HALL ROSE GARDEN

Nothing can compare with the sights and scents of a traditional english rose garden in full bloom throughout the summer. There is an abundance of flowers, delicate confections in pinks and whites or deeper velvety reds, each with its own rich and individual exotic perfume.

This area is planted throughout with 'English’ roses. The result of hybridising the wonderful older roses with modern repeat flowering varieties to get the best features of both. They include: 'Belle story', 'Perdita', 'Chaucer', 'Gertrude Jekyll', 'Mary Rose', 'The Countryman' and 'Wife of Bath', all in shades of pink. 'LD. Braithwaite' and 'Wenlock' in crimsons, and 'Winchester Cathedral' in white. Drink deeply of their heady perfume. Breathe in the scents of summer...

The old rose garden at Levens Hall is charmingly set in an intricate pattern of low hedges and enticing winding pathways. The tree at its centre is the Maidenhair tree Ginkgo biloba, a unique survivor. Once known only through fossil records, the species was re-discovered in China in 1758. The Levens specimen in the centre of the rose garden is about 60 years old. Unusually for a conifer, the Ginkgo is deciduous and has flat fan shaped leaves which turn a lovely yellow colour before falling in the Autumn

Opening Times & Ticket Prices

31 March - 10 October

Open Sundays to Thursdays

(Closed on Fridays and Saturdays during the Season, ALSO CLOSED SUNDAY 9th JUNE)

The Gardens

10.00am - 5.00pm

The House

Open 12 noon - 4.30pm

(Last admission 4.00 pm)

Admission

House & Gardens - £12.50

Gardens Only - £8.50

No charge for Children under 16 - accompanied by an adult (four children per adult maximum)

Free admission to the Gift Shop and Bellingham Buttery.

Details of all our roses are available on our web site. Over 1000 varieties to choose from. (click below)

www.countrygardenroses.co.uk

READ MORE >

 

Feb 13 • 2013 • BeautifulBloomEnglishLady.RosesPetalsRose of the WeekStandardfloribundagold

Rose Of The Week

 

THE ENGLISH LADY

Floribunda  2009  3ft

 

Now it has been included in the Gold Standard range this beautiful rose should gain in popularity and get the recognition it deserves.

 Stunning blooms of changing pastel shades as the bloom matures.  In the early stages the bloom is a lovely peachy shade which develops into an apricot blush, and eventually pales to a soft cream shade.

As the petals open they reveal superb stamens of gold, maroon or chocolate.  It really is an impressive display of colour.

A good repeat flowering habit throughout the summer, and excellent health and disease resistance.

Scented.

Highly recommended

 

Named after Susan Daniel the opera singer, and the rose helps raise funds for the 'Help For Heroes' charity.'

 Awards

Glasgow Certificate Of Merit 2009

GOLD STANDARD AWARD WINNER 2009

THE ENGLISH LADY  (Harlibra)

Since 2006 a few roses are selected each year for this prestigious award.   Based on cumulative information from invited independent judges, the Gold Standard is awarded to worthy varieties. 

Health,  floriferousness,  scent and commercial appeal are all considered key factors in the final choice.

Bred by Harness Roses. UK

For further information  please see  Gold Standard Roses on the Main Menu.

 

Details of all our roses are available on our web site. Over 1000 varieties to choose from. (click below)

www.countrygardenroses.co.uk

 

READ MORE >

 

Aug 27 • 2012 • BoscobelEnglishFlowersNew Roses For 2013Roseshrub

NEW ROSES FOR 2013

BOSCOBEL

English Shrub Rose.  David Austin. 2012  3ft

English Leander hybrid, ‘Boscobel’, bears rich salmon coloured flowers. “They commence as red buds which open at first to pretty cups, gradually developing into perfectly formed blooms of classic rosette formation”, says the rose breeder. The numerous small petals are of varying shades, mingling to provide a most pleasing effect. The delightful, medium-strong myrrh fragrance has a hawthorn character with hints of elderflower, pear and almond. It forms an upright shrub of medium size, with dark green, glossy foliage. All new varieties, according to David Austin Roses, are vigorous and healthy. Boscobel House, owned by English Heritage, was built in 1632. It is famous for the fact that Charles II hid there in an oak tree, whilst being pursued by Cromwell’s soldiers during the English Civil War. Available from November 2012

Details of all our roses are available on our web site. Over 1000 varieties to choose from.

www.countrygardenroses.co.uk

       

READ MORE >

 

Aug 01 • 2012 • EnglishGrowersHorticulturalRamblersRose NewsWeatherrosesseasonspecies.colin

ROSE NEWS FROM AROUND THE WORLD

 

WET SUMMER THREATENS ROSE WORLD

VETERAN rose grower Colin Gregory admits this summer’s wet weather has brought the horticultural industry “to a standstill” and growers could need to reassess how they grow, sell and market their product to succeed.

A turbulent summer in the UK has seen consistent rainfall and strong winds hinder rose growers across the region as many have struggled to cope with the sudden weather changes.

With more than 32 years of experience Colin believes this year has been one of the toughest on record and fears it could be a sign of things to come.

He said: “We seem to be having these challenges year in, year out. Sometimes we can have four seasons in one month. I think we have to be more adaptable and be prepared for the unexpected out of season.”

Established in 1997, Colin Gregory Roses of Weston Hills grows more than 250 varieties from specialities like this year’s rose of the year, Moment in Time, to the more traditional species such as climbers, ramblers and Old English.

However, Colin admits he could be forced to grow a smaller selection of roses as the uncertainty surrounding the weather means he can’t always guarantee sellable stock.

He continued: “I think as a director I’m going to have to sit down and reassess not just the position of how we grow, sell and market roses but also consider a lot of varieties we grow and ensure we can grow the best of the best varieties.”

This year’s selection has been heavily reliant on fungicides and insecticides to survive and if the wet weather continues more will be needed to keep the fragile stock alive in the coming weeks.

Colin hopes for a period of good weather towards the end of the summer while he still has product of sufficient quality to catch the tail end of the busy selling period.

USA

THINGS ARE LOOKING ROSIER

Among gardeners, roses are known as the aging celebrities of the flower world. Instead of the chemical peels and injectable fillers that keep Hollywood stars looking like starlets, roses must be doused with fungicides and pesticides and pumped up with fertilizers. Even in nature, a rosy glow does not always come naturally.

But at the New York Botanical Garden, in the Bronx, Peter E. Kukielski is trying to change that. The curator of the botanical garden’s Peggy Rockefeller Rose Garden, Mr. Kukielski is in the vanguard of a national movement to identify and promote rose varieties that will thrive without chemical intervention.

Since arriving at the garden in 2006, he has led a horticultural revolution, weeding out most of the 243 rose varieties he found when he got to the Bronx and introducing more than 600 new ones. Modern roses are the product of hybridizing, in which strains are mixed to create new varieties; that effort has focused on the beauty of the roses, not their toughness.

“Roses have existed on earth for 34 million years,” said Mr. Kukielski, surrounded by some of his charges under a beating sun. “The genetics of roses are intact, but our meddling has messed them up. One of the things that got left behind was disease resistance.”

Since his campaign began, the use of fungicide, once sprayed liberally to eradicate black spot, a common disease of roses, has fallen by 86 percent.

Another payoff of his search for hardier varieties is a longer season. The Bronx garden typically had two dazzling months. There was a colorful splash in June, and a second display in September. But the garden now puts on a show seven months of the year, blooming from May to November.

The transformation of the one-acre rose garden has coincided with an increased awareness about the risks of pesticides and chemical fertilizers in general. Some local governments and school districts have stopped using them entirely, while consumers have increasingly turned to organic products.

The shift was not easy. When Mr. Kukielski first approached growers, the reception was anything but warm. “Some people slammed the door in my face and others laughed,” he recalled.

Taking a cue from the high-stakes testing now so dominant in public education, Mr. Kukielski, who with his crew cut and beefy arms, looks more drill sergeant than rosarian, uses a 10-point rating scale for his roses, compiling data points like form, color, fragrance, foliage, duration of bloom and, most important, hardiness. He evaluates every rose in the garden once a month. Twice a year, he enlists volunteers to conduct their own evaluations.

“I may give the plant an 8, but if everyone else is giving it a 5, it’s obviously not a strong plant,” he said. “I might have given it an 8 because I love it so much. This evaluation system takes all the emotion out of it.”

In 2006, only 23 percent of the roses scored a 6 or higher, Mr. Kukielski’s threshold for a rose variety to remain in the mix. Last year, 87 percent scored a 6 or above. He has achieved that while rapidly expanding the number of varieties — currently at 693 — and scaling back on chemicals. His staff sprays sparingly for pests like spider mites and rose midges, but the formulations are lighter than in the past. Fertilizers are organic, with fish emulsion a favorite.

One rose variety that will soon be shown the wrought-iron gate is a hybrid tea rose named About Face. The blossoms are lovely: golden-apricot on the inside, pink outside. But the foliage has black spot and withered leaves carpet the ground beneath the bushes. “It’s a beautiful bloom, and it has a great name, but it’s not what we need it to be,” he said.

Nearby, Mr. Kukielski is conducting an even more radical experiment, part of the National Earth-Kind Rose Research Study, which was begun by Texas A&M University’s AgriLife Extension Service to find especially vigorous rose varieties. Two years ago, he planted 32 rose varieties in a small plot, gave them some initial water and then let them fend for themselves. “We’ve used no fertilizers, no sprays, no water,” he said.

The varieties, which have names like Carefree Beauty and All the Rage, have mostly thrived.

Mr. Kukielski empathizes with home gardeners who become frustrated when the roses they plant do not match the lush photographs they see in the mail-order catalogs. He blames some hybridizers who for years have put their energy into achieving a particular hue or form without concern for how well the plant will fare in the garden. “People tell me that they can’t grow roses, and what I tell them is that it’s not your fault,” he said. “A lot of the roses out there are not meant to succeed.”

Details of all our roses are available on our web site.

Over 1000 varieties to choose from.

www.countrygardenroses.co.uk

READ MORE >

 

Jul 11 • 2012 • AustinAutumnBarerootChelseaEnglishFlowerNew Roses For 2013Pottedroses

ROSE NEWS FROM AROUND THE WORLD

UK

NEW ROSES FOR AUTUMN DAVID AUSTIN ENGLISH ROSES

David Austin Roses have launched five new English Roses at this year’s Chelsea Flower Show. They will be available to order as bare root or potted roses from autumn 2012.                 Tranquillity ‘Tranquillity’ is an English Musk hybrid. The flowers are of a beautifully rounded shape with neatly placed petals, making up a perfect rosette. The buds are lightly tinged with yellow but as the flowers open they become pure white. There is a light apple fragrance. The growth is upright, gradually curving outwards at the top. ‘Tranquillity’ has typical light green Musk Rose foliage and is almost thornless.

Royal Jubilee ‘Royal Jubilee’, an English Alba hybrid, has been named to celebrate the Diamond Jubilee of Queen Elizabeth II. In the press release, the breeder refers to this variety as “a unique rose for a unique occasion”. The deep pink flowers are large and of a deep chalice shape; the petals are incurving so the stamens within can just be seen. The blooms have a rich fruity fragrance with hints of blackcurrant. ‘Royal Jubilee’ has very few thorns. The Lark Ascending ‘The Lark Ascending’ is again an English Musk hybrid. This variety illustrates the great diversity that is now to be found among English Roses. The flowers are cupped in shape and of a light apricot colouring. Produced from the ground upwards in heads of up to fifteen, they are medium in size, with about twenty petals in each bloom. They have a light fragrance that has been observed to vary from one flower to another. Some of them are Tea scented while others move towards the scent of myrrh. Heathcliff

David Austin says in the press release, “There are few roses as popular as those of deep crimson colouring, and none so difficult to breed”. However, their new rose, ‘Heathcliff’, an Old Rose hybrid, is a beautiful addition to English Roses of this colour. It has large, fully double flowers of a deep rosette shape. The deep crimson colour has a certain softness that reminds some of the old red Gallica Roses. It has shiny, deep green leaves and rather upright growth. Its fragrance is pleasing and rather unusual – Tea Rose with a mixture of Old Rose and just a hint of cedar wood. Boscobel

English Leander hybrid, ‘Boscobel’, bears rich salmon coloured flowers. “They commence as red buds which open at first to pretty cups, gradually developing into perfectly formed blooms of classic rosette formation”, says the rose breeder. The numerous small petals are of varying shades, mingling to provide a most pleasing effect. The delightful, medium-strong myrrh fragrance has a hawthorn character with hints of elderflower, pear and almond. It forms an upright shrub of medium size, with dark green, glossy foliage. All new varieties, according to David Austin Roses, are vigorous and healthy.

Details of all our roses are available on our web site. Over 1000 varieties to choose from.

www.countrygardenroses.co.uk

READ MORE >

 

Dec 04 • 2011 • EnglishFlowersFragranceMaid MarionNew Roses For 2012PetalsRoseRosette

New Roses For 2012

MAID MARION

David Austin English Rose.  2010 .  3ft

'Maid Marion' at its best, is considered to be one of the most superbly formed flowers in the English Rose collection.

The buds start as rounded cups with larger outer petals, enclosing numerous smaller petals within.   These open to the most perfect rosette-shaped flowers in the form of a saucer; the outer petals forming a perfectly rounded rim.

Their colour is a clear rose pink. The growth is relatively upright but quite bushy and compact. Initially the fragrance is a soft myrrh - as the flower ages it becomes more fruity with a distinct clove character.

'Maid Marion' was the companion of the mythical hero 'Robin Hood' of Sherwood Forest.

Essential reading for all English Rose enthusiasts.

‘The English Roses’ by David Austin. See Gardeners Gift Shop on Main Web Menu

Details of all our roses are available on our web site. Over 1000 varieties to choose from.

www.countrygardenroses.co.uk

READ MORE >

 

Nov 11 • 2011 • CountryEnglishNew Roses For 2012ScentShropshireWollertonfragrantmyrrh

NEW ROSES FOR 2012

WOLLERTON  OLD HALL

David Austin English Shrub Rose. 2011.  5ft

This is the most fragrant of this year’s new varieties and, indeed, one of the most fragrant of all English Roses. It has the distinctive myrrh scent which is rarely found in roses, appearing first in ‘Constance Spry’, and later in ‘Scepter’d Isle’. The plump buds have attractive flashes of red. These open to form round, rich buttery yellow coloured blooms which eventually pale to a softer creamy colour. Even when the flowers are fully open, they retain their beautifully rounded chalice shape. It forms a particularly healthy and bushy shrub with many stems shooting from the base. It remains relatively upright and has few thorns. With its soft colouring ‘Wollerton Old Hall’ will very easily blend with a wide range of colour schemes, planted with roses or other shrubs and perennials. Its more upright habit makes it suitable for both formal and informal situations. It should be positioned where its strong scent can be easily appreciated. Wollerton Old Hall in Shropshire has one of the most beautiful private gardens in the country, not far from Country Garden Roses . The gardens are set around a 16th Century Hall and feature roses in creative plant combinations, including many English Roses.

Wollerton Old Hall is open to the public on selected days throughout the summer.

Details of all our roses are available on our web site.

Over 1000 varieties to choose from.

www.countrygardenroses.co.uk

READ MORE >

 

Nov 05 • 2011 • ChaliceDiseaseEnglishFragranceGo;denJudeNew Roses For 2012yellow

NEW ROSES FOR 2012

JUDE THE OBSCURE

David Austin. Shrub Rose. 1989.  3ft-4ft

'Jude The Obscure' vies with 'Golden Celebration' for the first place as the most magnificent of the English Roses. Its flowers are very large and of incurved chalice shape. Their colour is a pleasing medium yellow on the inside of the petals and a paler yellow on the outside. It has excellent, strong and almost disease free growth. This rose is particularly fine in a dry climate, although it may ball in the rain. A very strong, and unusual delicious fragrance with a fruity note reminiscent of guava and sweet white wine. Quite hardy plus good repeat flowering habit.

Named after the character in Thomas Hardy's novel.

Details of all our roses are available on our web site.

Over 1000 varieties to choose from.

www.countrygardenroses.co.uk

READ MORE >

 

Oct 30 • 2011 • AromaEnglishFlowerHeritageLotteryRose Newssensory

ROSE NEWS

GRIMSBY.  ENGLAND

NEW ROSE GARDEN FOR PEOPLE'S PARK

The sweet scent of roses will soon fill one of Grimsby's most popular parks, as £17,000 is spent on a new garden.

A reported, nearly £3-million from the Heritage Lottery Fund has been spent on the transformation of People's Park, with the last pot of £17,000 helping to recreate a Victorian rose garden.

The final stage of restoration work will fully return the park to its former glory, and see work carried out on the former children's play area.

Councillor Andrew De Freitas said the Friends Of The Park group are also looking at creating a sensory garden and placing water lilies in the lake.

"It has really developed as a result of the money spent, and there was originally a rose garden, so it will be nice to have it back," he said.

"The park now offers something for everyone."

Sue Pearson, environmental management officer at North East Lincolnshire Council, said work is expected to be completed by the end of October.

"The roses will need pruning and looking after but all of the work will be done in house, and there are already some roses in the park," she said.

"The aroma will be great and they will flower from April into October. It's a nice way to spend the last of the Heritage Lottery money."

Regular visitor Jane Mansfield, 82, of Cleethorpes, said: "I always come here and used to bring my three sons when they were small.

"Roses are traditionally English and it will look beautiful when the garden is complete."

Brenda Dixon, 68, of Grimsby, who also visits the park, said: "The sensory aspect of the garden will help with our other projects.

"The smell from the roses will benefit those who cannot see the plants and it will look really colourful for others. "

The work will involve the recreation of the original ornamental bedding planting, laid out in the form of four floral scrolls around a central circular bed.

The scrolls will be formed from metal edging and will be planted with a mix of roses, topiary and bedding plants.

The original circular path along the course of the historic layout is to be resurfaced with self-binding gravel.

...............

Details of all our roses are available on our web site.

Over 1000 varieties to choose from.

www.countrygardenroses.co.uk

READ MORE >

 


New Roses
For 2021

Shop

Rose Care
Products

Shop

Our Simple Guide
to Rose Care

Read More