There may be delays in some areas due to courier staff and drivers isolating.

Menu British Grown

Tag: Bushes


Jan 24 • 2013 • BloomBudsBushesColdGrowingMarketRose NewsThornWarmerroses

ROSE NEWS FROM AROUND THE WORLD

Mumbai, Jan. 18:

A warmer winter this year has turned out to be a thorn in the flesh for rose growing farmers. In Pune and across Bangalore, the winter temperature has increased by 4 degree Celsius. Both these centres are major areas for rose cultivation. The higher than normal temperature has resulted in an earlier bloom of roses. This, in turn, has advanced the arrival of the roses in the market. Planters project that at least 25 per cent of the blooms are set to arrive in the market much ahead of Valentine’s Day this year. The ongoing concern of floriculturists is that the sharp rise in temperature could lead to damage and consequent rejection of export consignments. In the domestic market, most planters are expecting a glut that would result in prices plunging. Roses fetch the maximum value during the week preceding Valentine’s Day, with prices rising as high as Rs 10 a stem in the wholesale market compared with Rs 2-4 on an average day. For the fiscal 2011-12, India exported about Rs 320 crore worth of flowers, half of which were roses. Usually, roses take around 45-50 days to grow. Farmers generally begin pruning the rose bushes by the first week of December. This tends to yield a good crop by January 26. Between January 26 and February 14, roses are stored in cold rooms, and then shipped to Amsterdam ready for the auctions, to be finally shipped across the retail markets in Europe. This year, farmers’ fear that the buds are bound to be ready to harvest by January 21, five days ahead of schedule. “These roses would not be accepted by exporters, because they would be too early for dispatch to Europe for Valentine’s Day buyers. Farmers would be forced to sell it in the domestic market, putting pressure on prices,” said Milind Manerikar, Chief Executive Officer of Sankalp Farms, a major rose grower near Pune. He said that if the rose buds do get exported, they are bound to suffer damage due to the early blooming. This, Manerikar says, could result in disputes between the buyers and the sellers. Bangalore-based rose farmer Shreekant Shivappa said that such temperature rises prove to be a double whammy for farmers. “On the one hand, prices of all agriculture inputs are increasing and on the other, the farmers’ margins are shrinking. Rose farming is increasing becoming an unviable business,” he said. Agriculture expert Jagadeesh Sunkad said that such unusual weather is a result of climate change. “Not just roses, even other cash crops such as rubber and tea are bound to be affected given the undue stress. It is time we send an SOS to the government,” he said.

Details of all our roses are available on our web site. Over 1000 varieties to choose from. (click below)

www.countrygardenroses.co.uk

READ MORE >

 

Sep 22 • 2012 • MemorialParksPlanted.ShuttleRose NewsRose.Garden.Bushes

PALESTINE

The Space Shuttle Crew Remembered

Brenda Vice, a former Palestine parks and recreation director, wants the memorial rose garden originally built to honor the crew lost in the 1986 Space Shuttle Challenger disaster rebuilt.

The Space Shuttle Challenger (mission STS-51-L) broke apart shortly into its flight over the Atlantic Ocean on the morning of Jan. 28, 1986, leading to the deaths of its seven crew members — Michael J. Smith, Dick Scobee, Ronald McNair, Ellison Onizuka, Christa McAuliffe, Gregory Jarvis and Judith Resnik.

After the disaster, it was under Vice’s direction that the parks and recreation department with the city’s approval planted a memorial rose garden which featured seven rose bushes in honor of the seven crew members killed and a bronze plaque. The garden was located on Crockett Road across Reagan Park, in the grassy area next to where the yellow depot use to be.

“The rose garden had a rose bush for each astronaut who died aboard the Challenger and a beautiful bronze plaque with their names on it,” Vice explained.

The former Palestine resident who now resides in New Mexico still has family here and visits often. It was during one of her visits that she discovered the rose garden no longer existed.

“About a year and half ago I noticed that the rose garden once located on Crockett Road in front of Reagan Park is no longer there,” she said. “We planted that garden to commemorate and honor the Challenger astronauts.

“I would like to know what happened to the rose garden the city dedicated to the seven astronauts killed in the Challenger disaster.”

Not wanting Palestine to lose part of its past, Vice began inquiring about the garden.

She said she called the city of Palestine about a year and half ago and after not hearing from anyone enlisted the help of longtime Palestine resident and local historian, Bonnie Woolverton. It was Woolverton through her persistence who discovered that the rose garden was hit and destroyed by a vehicle years ago.

Woolverton also found that the bronze plaque was stored in a locker at the city warehouse.

Vice said she again contacted city officials and asked what it would take to replace the rose bushes and put the plaque back up.

“They told me they (the city) would take a donation,” Vice said. “So I sent the city a check for $50 to replace the seven rose bushes.”

According to Vice, the check she mailed to the city was cashed but the rose garden was not replanted.

When Vice was in town last April for her father’s funeral, she discovered that the city had planted one rose bush at the Museum for East Texas Culture under the plaque for Coach Bob Knight. She was not certain if that rose bush was purchased with her money.

Vice said her frustration is with the delayed response she has received from city officials.

“The parks and recreation department spent money in 1986 to build that beautiful rose garden for the Challenger astronauts. We had a nice ceremony with a 21-gun salute. For the city to drag its feet, buy one rose bush and put up no plaque is frustrating.”

Her efforts to rebuild the rose garden have been ongoing for the past 18 months.

“The rose garden needs to be back. I have offered to send more money,” Vice said. “I’ve even offered to come back and build it myself. Those astronauts died and we commemorated their death with that rose garden.

“I’m willing to help, I’ve sent them money to buy rose bushes, and they (city officials) didn’t do what they said they were going to do,” a frustrated Vice said.

Not one to give up, Vice began trying to contact Mayor Bob Herrington, who emailed her last April.

Herrington said initially he didn’t know about the rose garden.

“That’s gonna happen when you get new council members,” the mayor said.

“The city still has the plaque but it’s in pretty bad shape. There’s a dent in it and it has mold. It’s still readable but it is damaged.”

He said perhaps the best way to proceed is to have an item considering the rose garden placed before the parks and recreation department and let it decide what to do.

The mayor said he would make sure the item gets on an agenda for consideration soon.

“Brenda was so good, she really improved the parks in Palestine,” Herrington said. “I understand her desire to rebuild the rose garden.”

Herrington hinted that rebuilding the Challenger rose garden closer to the Museum for East Texas Culture was a possibility.

“It would be a better location,” he said.

“It’s symbolic in its own way. We want to do what’s right but there’s been a ton of activity this summer with the parks and recreation department,” the mayor said. “The parks and recreation department has been overwhelmed with projects this summer.”

Herrington said he was pleased to learn of Vice’s efforts to rebuild the rose garden.

“I’m glad Brenda brought it up. Now’s a good time,” he said, citing that the Columbia Scientific Balloon Facility, which was renamed after the 2003 Space Shuttle Columbia tragedy, was expanding its efforts to get more involved in the community.

“It may be a good time to rededicate both the Columbia facility and the memorial garden for the Challenger crew,” the mayor said. “We can address everything and have a lasting memorial to those two tragic events.”

As for Vice’s offer to help rebuild the rose garden, the mayor quickly stated, “the city loves volunteers.

“We have no problem with her coming back to help with it. It would be fitting for her to come back and help with it. I’m glad she wants to help. We’re gonna make it happen.”

Vice is quick to admit that she just wants the town she “calls home” to continue to grow but not at the expense of its past.

“When I go home to Palestine, it’s like going home. I’m so proud of that town, it’s like a little piece of Americana,” she said.

Although all for progress and improvement, Vice believes the city should take care of the history that’s here.

“Don’t destroy your history to put in the new stuff,” she stressed.

She also believes that Herrington will get the ball rolling.

“He loves Palestine. He’s a Palestine boy; he’s gonna get it done,” she said.

Vice worked as director of the city parks and recreation department for about 10 years in the early 1980s. Under her leadership, the department put in the popular dolphin and wading pool at Reagan Park. She remembers the city honoring the Palestine Lions Club for funding the wading pool in the park.

“I loved working for the city,” she continued. “But I just hate to see things that were put there to stay forever and ever and then because they’re destroyed are gone.”

It’s her love of Palestine that fuels Vice’s desire to rebuild the rose garden.

“I love that town. I never give up. This (rose garden) has got to happen. The city needs to give me the authorization to come back and do it. I can replant the rose bushes, run a soaker (water) hose and hook up a timer. I can be there (Palestine) in 12 hours.”

Vice suggested that once in place, a local garden club may adopt the memorial rose garden as one of its projects.

“Let’s get it done,” she pleaded. “There’s going to be seven rose bushes in that rose garden, all different colors. Details of all our roses are available on our web site. Over 1000 varieties to choose from.

www.countrygardenroses.co.uk

READ MORE >

 

Aug 11 • 2012 • BushesFlowerGardensRoseRose GardensSocietyWeatherchiswellro

ROSE NEWS FROM AROUND THE WORLD

UK

GARDENS OF THE ROSE UNDER THREAT

THE future of the Gardens of the Rose and the society which runs it hinges on the success of a planning application for parking which is being submitted next month.

 

The rose gardens in Chiswell Green Lane have just closed after this summer’s temporary five-week opening period during which visitor numbers were down because of the poor weather.

Despite that shortfall, opening the gardens is the biggest money spinner for the Royal National Rose Society (RNRS) and raises more than income from membership.

But unless the RNRS succeeds in getting planning permission for 30 permanent parking spaces adjoining the gardens, both the society and the grounds will be forced to close.

The Gardens of the Rose have been a visitor attraction in St Albans for many years but the parking situation has been problematical since part of the RNRS land was sold for the creation of Butterfly World next door and the two were to have shared access and parking.

But the society and Butterfly World were unable to reach agreement and as a result, the RNRS has to apply for temporary parking for a short period in the summer – and unless it can reach a permanent resolution the board has already decided that closure is the only answer.

Chief executive Roz Hamilton confirmed this week: “We are putting in another planning application for 30 parking spaces just outside the gardens and if we don’t get that we can’t continue.”

The sticking point is that the site the RNRS wants to use is in the Green Belt and has already been turned down for planning permission before.

But it is throwing everything at one final attempt including a commissioned report about the number of accidents around the site – none of which have happened in the summer when the gardens are open – the site’s reclassification as a leisure facility and an offer to put in mature trees to screen the parking site from view.

The gardens were open from June 9 until July 29 this year and although visitors were down from between 8,000 and 9,000 to 6,500 because of the weather, the opening still accounts for more than 50 per cent of the RNRS income because of the success of the tea room and rose sales.

Ideally the gardens would open for four months a year so visitors could see the second flush of roses in the summer and it would have a licence to conduct weddings – which cannot happen until a permanent resolution of the parking situation is reached.

Roz said: “This planning application is critical because if it doesn’t succeed the society will fold and the garden will close.”

She added: “It is a long fight we have had here and we are eternal optimists but you have to take a realistic view of the financial situation and we can’t survive unless we take more money from our garden opening.”

Details of all our roses are available on our web site.

Over 1000 varieties to choose from.

www.countrygardenroses.co.uk

   

READ MORE >

 

Jul 09 • 2012 • BushesFlowersGardenGrassesLeavesRoseRose GardensTrees

Rose News From Around The World

USA

Hershey Rose Garden. Pennsylvania

The Hershey Rose Gardens  Well Worth A Visit

 Mention Hershey, Pennsylvania to anyone and they will immediately identify it with chocolate kisses and candy bars, and if they haven't got a sweet tooth, they may think of the gut-wrenching yet exhilarating roller coasters of Hershey Park. Touted as the “sweetest place on earth,” the streets are lined with alternating brown and silver street lights designed to look like chocolate kisses, wrapped in foil and unwrapped. But unless you're a lover of flowers, you probably haven't heard of the Hershey Rose Garden.

Having lived but a few miles from Hershey for most of my life, I was aware of the rose gardens, but like most people who live close to an attraction, I never made time to visit. It was always one of those things that I planned to do one day, but simply didn't have it on my list of priorities. The rose is my favorite flower and has been for as long as I can remember.

I'm especially attracted to the miniature ones and have purchased them for my mother almost every Mother's Day. Every time Mother's Day rolls around, I'm reminded that I still haven't made my trek to the gardens. I make my purchase and then promise myself that this will be the year I'll visit, only to become busy with some project that takes up all my time and before I realize it, the leaves are falling from the trees and I'm pulling out the winter hats and coats.

This year was different. My boyfriend decided it was time I made that visit. He started with little suggestions now and then, which I sort of heard and nodded an absent minded “uh-huh” to. Then he stepped it up to reminiscing about visits he had made so many years ago with his parents. Again, I gave the obligatory nod and mumbled response. I was always just so busy being focused on other things. Finally, he simply said he thought we should go on a particular day the coming week and me being my usual preoccupied self, nodded absentmindedly and went on about my business as usual.

The night before the chosen day, he asked me what time I wanted to leave to go over to the gardens and I realized I'd been had. I didn't want to get up early to go look at some flowers and I surely didn't want to rush around to get there. I picked early afternoon, thinking one or two hours for visiting would be plenty before heading home so I could make dinner. As it turned out, I was terribly wrong, but that comes later.

We arrived at about one in the afternoon and walked along a shaded walk lined with flowers and decorative bushes and grasses. It was very pretty and a nice hint at what may be waiting beyond the admission building. When we stepped up to the window to pay for two adult admissions, I thought my eyes were going to bug out of my head. Without a word, I handed over the $22 fee for the two of us. As we headed around the corner of the building to enter the gardens, I leaned toward Mark and told him quietly I couldn't believe we'd just paid that much money to look at a few flowers. After all, I could walk down any residential street in our neighborhood and look at them for free.

We stepped beyond the tall trees surrounding the admissions building and a whole new world was opened for me. It was breath taking! Those “few” flowers I'd been griping about only seconds before, were spread out before me in a magnificent display of wonder. 5,000 rose bushes of 275 varieties and various colors grew in perfectly placed bed after bed, row after row, all surrounding a gorgeous pond with a fabulous water fountain in the very center.

I stood there awestruck for quite a few moments, my mind furiously trying to figure out how in the world I would see all there was to see in the little bit of time I had allotted. There are over 23 acres providing a home for a marvelous collection of eleven different themed gardens, one of which is a children's garden, in addition to the Butterfly House.

Finally, I simply decided to remain within the central part of the grounds, surrounded by roses. I knew we wouldn't get to see all the other gardens, and wished I had been smart enough to begin my visit earlier so I wouldn't feel as though I had to rush to see everything. As it turned out, I was able to see the perennials garden, the Children's Garden, and the Butterfly House before we finally took our leave almost five hours later.

As one would expect with roses, there's a bit of a romantic story attached to the Hershey Rose Gardens. Milton Hershey and his wife Catherine (Kitty) lived in a mansion they named High Point, appropriately named due to its position on a rise overlooking the Hershey chocolate factory. He was 41 and she was only 26 when they married in 1898. As the story goes, Milton gave Kitty a bouquet of fresh flowers every day of their marriage, as she took great pleasure in gardens and their flowers. Milton, too, was a lover of horticulture and flowers.

Their idyllic marriage ended in 1915 when Kitty died following an extended illness. Three years later, a memorial rose garden in her honor was planted at High Point by her husband who was never to remarry. The garden and grounds had always been open to visitors from the moment the Hershey's had completed construction. Kitty had been active in adding her personal gardening touches throughout the town with plantings of flowers and trees, believing the people would enjoy their homes more if they were made “nice”.

The Hershey Rose Gardens opened in 1937 on only 3.5 acres, but there were 12,000 roses bushes to see. This year marks the 75th anniversary of the gardens, and with the celebration, the rose named for Milton S. Hershey in 1940 has been reintroduced. It was originally planted in the garden in 1941 and over the years, the number of bushes had dwindled to just six of them. As a result, budwood was sent to growers in South Carolina and Canada in time to have 20 of the bushes planted for this year. It's expected that there will be about 75 by next year, with enough in 2014 to be able to sell to visitors and flower shops.

By the time we left the gardens, I had captured more than 400 pictures of the most gorgeous flowers I've ever seen. I rushed to my computer to get them downloaded so I could look at them all over again. While I was busy with my camera and computer, Mark took to reading the garden brochure given to all visitors. We discovered, to our disappointment, that there are yearly memberships to be had. The cost is $60 per couple or $75 for families with children under the age of 18. The family membership also covers grandchildren under the age of 18. Our disappointment stemmed from the fact that had we read the brochure while we were at the gardens and decided we wanted a membership, they would have counted our admission fee toward the membership.

Mark picked up the phone on the slim chance that their membership director might cut us a break. When he reached the woman in charge of memberships, he explained what had happened and asked if they would be willing to consider the day's admission price if we came the next day to purchase a membership. Not only did she give us the discount, but she gave us more than a few days. And to make sure there was no mix up she gave Mark her name and business number, as well as emailed the folks at the admissions building to inform them of the arrangement. When we took my grandson a few days later, they not only were aware of the arrangement, but they knew us by name.

In addition to the right to view the gardens, there are many planned activities throughout the year for which both children and adults are invited without cost as a member. There is an annual reception and newsletters sent out to inform members of events and issues. My favorite perk is the one where a membership to the Hershey Gardens is reciprocated at a number of other botanical gardens across the country.

We've been to the gardens three times so far since we joined a month ago. I still have not seen everything there is to see. I can't think of any other activity or organization I've belonged to that has provided so much for the money spent. If you're coming to Hershey, The Gardens is one attraction well worth visiting, but make sure you've given yourself plenty of time to take it all in!

The more beautiful you make something which people can see and use, the more enjoyment they will get out of it.” ~~~Milton S. Hershey

Details of all our roses are available on our web site. Over 1000 varieties to choose from.

www.countrygardenroses.co.uk

 

READ MORE >

 

Jun 08 • 2012 • BushesGardenGrowthLeavesParkRoseRose NewsRosetteStemsVirus

Rose News From Around The World

USA

Killer virus ravages rose gardens in the USA

There is no cure, experts say, so the only way to stop the attack is to dig up all infected bushes and destroy them.

Marsha Ruse of Overland Park recently removed from her garden several rosebushes that were suffering from rose rosette virus,

Rose rosette

The symptoms include:

• Distortion and reddening of leaves.

• Uncontrolled growth of stems.

• Excessive thorn production.

Experts warn that some reddening from normal early-season growth, or herbicidal damage, could be mistaken for rose rosette.

Gardeners concerned about their rose plants can send samples to Kansas State’s plant pathology lab. To learn how to send a sample, go to www.plantpath.ksu.edu.

// Reports of a virus that attacks roses are proliferating around the Kansas City area, and experts say there is no cure.

The disease, called rose rosette, has been known throughout the Midwest for decades. But this spring, agriculture officials in Johnson and Jackson counties are hearing more reports from gardeners with sick roses.

In Overland Park, the disease has progressed enough this year that the city is planning to rip out several of its rose beds along traffic routes and at city buildings and replace them with other plants.

Sarah Patterson, the city forester, said officials didn’t know the cost yet but would tear out rose beds in at least four locations, including the intersection of Shawnee Mission Parkway and Metcalf Avenue, and at the Jack Sanders Justice Center.

“I think this is spreading more rapidly than most people realize,” she said.

Some home gardeners are being hit, too.

Marsha Ruse of Overland Park knew her roses were dying almost as soon as they bloomed this spring.

She has cared for the five rose plants for eight years, she said, and they have always been healthy. Ruse identified the reddened leaves, uncontrolled growth and excessive numbers of new thorns on her plants and knew she was going to have to destroy them.

“I’m very disappointed,” said Ruse, who volunteers with the Johnson County office of K-State Research and Extension. “The only way to do it is to dig them up and get rid of them.”

Ruse’s roses were of the Knock Out variety that has grown popular over the past decade with home gardeners, as well as commercial and municipal landscapers. Knock Outs are impervious to most diseases, but they are susceptible to rose rosette, which attacks all varieties of roses.

Experts recommend digging up and destroying infected plants. Microscopic mites, travelling on wind currents, spread the disease-causing virus as they feed on roses.

Commercial and retail landscapers said they have seen the rose disease throughout the area. Chad Gilliland, a plant care specialist with Arbor Masters, a landscaping firm in Shawnee, said he had seen more and more of the disease over the past five years.

“It seems like about every year it gets progressively worse,” he said.

Officials at the University of Missouri Extension in Jackson County have also heard more talk about rose rosette. Lala Kumar, a horticultural specialist, said he was hearing more reports of the disease this spring, and they were also coming earlier in the season. He said the disease tends to peak in June or July, but he has already taken four reports of it this year.

Laura Dickinson, master gardener coordinator at Johnson County Extension, said the county’s gardening help hotline averages two or three calls per month about rose rosette in most years. But this spring, Dickinson counts that many calls each week.

Not everyone has seen an increase in the disease, though.

Public works and parks officials in Roeland Park and Prairie Village said they had not had problems with rose rosette but were watching out for it. Kansas City’s parks department maintains 60 rose beds throughout the city that have shown no signs of the disease, said Forest Decker, superintendent of parks.

The virus occasionally appears in the municipal rose garden at Loose Park in Kansas City. Judy Penner, the director of the park, said she used a miticide — an insecticide for mites — to keep the disease in check.

Several experts warned that the disease can be spread by contaminated pruning shears and advised gardeners not to put uprooted plants in compost piles.

Raymond Cloyd, an entomologist at Kansas State University, said the disease-causing mites may have been introduced to North America before 1970 as a means of suppressing wild rose plants that were seen as a nuisance at the time.

Cloyd said using a miticide to stop the mites from spreading the disease would be only marginally effective because they burrow deep into the rose’s tissues. He recommended removing the plants and destroying them.

If the roots are completely removed, roses can grow safely in the same spot, but Johnson County Extension recommends waiting for a few weeks or until the next growing season.

THE UK IS NOT AFFECTED.

Details of all our roses are available on our web site. Over 1000 varieties to choose from.

www.countrygardenroses.co.uk

READ MORE >

 

Jun 04 • 2012 • BedsBushesFlowersGardensGreenhouseHardierPerennialsRoseRose Gardens

Rose News From Around The World

USA

SINNISSIPPI ROSE GARDENS

ROCKFORD — Rose lovers from far and beyond flock to Sinnissippi Gardens in Rockford to see the vast varieties of the All-American Rose Selection flowers. The gardens include about 2,000 rose plants throughout, along with the 32-foot floral clock that is planted each year with annuals raised in a greenhouse. According to garden maintenance coordinator Haylie Goodin, Sinnissippi Gardens has the highest concentration of roses compared to other gardens. “A lot of other rose gardens you go into have perennials mixed in with the roses, but we have strictly roses in the beds,” she said. The rose garden was planted in the mid-1920s by Rockford Park District. “The footprint you see now is the same footprint it has been historically,” said Goodin. “We haven’t changed as far as bed design and layout.” Goodin said the garden has been accredited by the All-America Rose Selection for many years. Sinnissippi used to receive the newest variety of rose plants from the AARS, and also would be honored with each year’s winning rose. “We would get to plant the rose a year before it was out on the market,” she said. In the 1950s, the garden was renovated and the floral clock, which is the centerpiece of the garden, was designed and built by a local Rockford company. The rose beds in the garden are separated by family of rose. Goodin said they come from all around. A lot of them come from Michigan and Canada, because the bushes grown there are “hardier” and need little maintenance as far as pest and disease control. Each rose is labeled with variety and family. Each rose contains its own quirky name such as “Hi, Neighbor,” “Chuckles,” “Aunt Honey” and even “Dick Clark.” Goodin said the names are made up by the hybridizer. “It comes from whatever inspires them, whether it’s a life experience, a person or something else,” she said. Although the park district is responsible for maintaining the rose garden, local master gardeners assist with weeding, deadheading and care of the beds. One of those master gardeners is Ed Leach of Rockford, who has been a master gardener for 12 years. Leach said that master gardeners need 30 hours of volunteer work and 10 hours of continuing education to keep their license. He said many local master gardeners volunteer maintenance at Sinnissippi for their needed hours. Leach has been in charge of the ‘Carefree Wonder’ rose bed for three years. He claims the roses are high maintenance. At the end of May, Leach was out deadheading the roses. He said it is too early to be doing the work, but because of the warmer spring this year, the roses bloomed early. “You shouldn’t have to be deadheading this much this early,” he said. “But, if you want to keep them blooming, you have to cut off the blooms.” Goodin said the roses bloom in full mass two cycles a year. One in mid-June and the second in late August or early September. This year, the roses bloomed in the middle of May because of the warm spring. Currently, a renovation is taking place next to the rose gardens. The Nicholas Conservatory was built and opened in fall 2011. The conservatory replaced a greenhouse that was built in the 1920s. It is an exhibition of tropical trees, plants, flowers and floral displays. Goodin said the greenhouse that was torn down was a growing and production site for plants and flowers. The greenhouse also included display areas for visitors to view. “Now it’s more viewing and very little production,” she said. “It’s a whole different experience to come in and see both gardens.” Right now, the park district is trying to coordinate a path to view the Sinnissippi Gardens and the conservatory at once. “It’s the first year we’ve had both open and functioning at the same time,” Goodin said. Construction still is ongoing around the outside of the conservatory and to the Sinnissippi Lagoon which sits across from the rose garden. Goodin said the lagoon was completely redone and is scheduled to reopen this fall. She said when everything is completed it will be a destination to view all the gardens with the conservatory included.

Details of all our roses are available on our web site. Over 1000 varieties to choose from.

www.countrygardenroses.co.uk

READ MORE >

 

Mar 11 • 2012 • BushesFlowersHybridRose Newsgardenersnurseryroses

ROSE NEWS FROM AROUND THE WORLD

USA

ROSE INDUSTRY NOT LOOKING GOOD IN THE STATES

BELOVED 

For a century, devoted gardeners have appreciated the marvels of delicate and finicky hybrid roses and referred to them by name, like pets or family. The product of generations of breeding, the queen of flowers could act like a spoiled princess because its delicate blooms offered a special reward.

In recent years, though, time-strapped homeowners have traded their big teas for compact shrub roses — utilitarian soldiers in the landscape that could cover ground without fuss. Our desire for the carefree — no-iron shirts, no-wax floors, and now low-maintenance yards — has brought the rose industry to a crossroads. "At some point, it becomes a self-fulfilling prophecy," said Charlie Anderson, president of Weeks Roses, the only major company still creating new varieties of full-size roses. "[Landscape] roses will be all you have; the beautiful, unique hybrid teas will be gone." The flagging economy has compounded the rose industry's troubles. Two years ago, rose giant Jackson & Perkins, which had annually shipped 10 million bushes nationwide, filed for bankruptcy protection. Many of the hybrid roses the company created — such as Diana, Catalina and Beloved — may soon disappear from the mass market as the supply of those bushes dries up. "Roses are viewed as an extravagance, and they're still trying to shed that stigma," said Seth Taylor of Capital Nursery. "People have a very specific thing in mind when they think of a rose — it's full and lush and romantic. That's your traditional rose, what people love," Taylor said. "The single-petaled shrub roses are gaining a foothold with the public, but when my customers look at those flowers, they say, 'That's not a rose.'" While gardeners may have visions of old-fashioned roses plucked from cottage gardens, their interest in growing them has waned, said Jolene Adams, incoming national president of the American Rose Society. "Many homeowners have had some experience — usually in their mother's or grandmother's gardens — so they'll try growing roses," she said. "But without sufficient knowledge [on how to care for them], the roses languish and do not grow to their full, beautiful potential. And they're not replaced if they die." Most of the nation's rosebushes originate in California's Central Valley. But unlike with wheat or tomatoes, it takes several years to produce a single crop of rosebushes. Hybridizers typically will test 400,000 seedlings to find one or two new varieties. Once selected, a new hybrid will be developed for seven to 10 years before it's released into the market. When ready for sale, field-grown bushes are 2 years old. Winter is prime rose-planting time. But this month, local gardeners are finding limited selections at nurseries and home centers. "I observed dramatically fewer roses in the nurseries this year," said T.J. David, co-founder of the World Peace Rose Garden in Sacramento's Capitol Park. "The financial ills of the rose growers will cause a slowdown in the number of new varieties of roses that are available for sale," he said. "Since growers make plans years in advance, it may take a year or two to see the full impact." The annual wholesale value of California's rose crop dropped 55% to $27.20 million in 2010 from a high of $61.05 million in 2003, according to nursery industry expert Hoy Carman, a retired UC Davis professor. "The whole nursery industry is down," Carman said. "In 2008, sales just plummeted." Said Adams of the Rose Society: "Roses are not the first thing homeowners think of when they want to plant a garden. Competition with other choice plants is fierce.... The industry is going to have to change — and supply roses that the customers can use in the landscape." Most major rose growers have gone bankrupt or consolidated with other wholesale nurseries. Weeks Roses, in Wasco near Bakersfield, survived its bankruptcy and is now owned by Indiana-based Gardens Alive Inc. On 1,000 leased acres, Weeks will harvest about 3 million bushes this year. During grafting and harvest season, it employs almost 400 people. Jackson & Perkins, acquired by J&P Park Acquisitions Inc. of South Carolina, no longer develops and grows new roses. Before bankruptcy, the company farmed 5,000 acres in Wasco with 20,000 bushes per acre. Without buyers, many of those bushes were burned. Once a breeder goes bankrupt, its roses usually disappear with it. Rose patents — good for 18 to 20 years — may be sold, but budwood and mother plants are lost. Many Jackson & Perkins roses are now on the endangered list. "Some will be preserved," Anderson said. "But a lot of varieties were lost; there was no budwood to collect [to create new hybrid bushes]. Most will just disappear into the ether."

Details of all our roses are available on our web site. Over 1000 varieties to choose from.

www.countrygardenroses.co.uk

 

READ MORE >

 

Mar 05 • 2012 • BloomBushesCuttingsGardenHorticultureNurseriesRoseRose Gardens

Rose news from Around the world

USA

HERSHEY ROSE GARDEN

Besides building a business, a town and a school for orphaned children, Milton S. Hershey’s support of local horticulture earned him his own rose.

Having a town named after you is cool enough, but having your own rose? Now that’s cool.

When asked to sponsor a national rosarium in Washington, D.C., Hershey instead decided to create a “nice garden of roses” in his hometown.

Working with horticulturist Harry Erdman, Hershey designed a 3½-acre rose garden that included a small pond and more than 12,000 rose bushes of 700 varieties. The Hershey Rose Garden opened to the public in 1937.

The following year, the American Rose Society honored Hershey’s support by naming a rose after him. In 1940, the M.S. Hershey Rose, a scarlet-crimson red (velvet-black red) was planted in Hershey Gardens.

Unfortunately, the number of M.S. Hershey Rose bushes dwindled over the years. But now officials and supporters have launched a campaign to bring the beautiful namesake rose back to its former glory.

Using cuttings from existing bushes, the rose is being bred by two nurseries. Several of the new bushes, developed with advanced methods to fight disease, will be planted this year. By next year, 75 of the rose bushes will bloom in the gardens.

The Hershey Gardens encompasses 23 acres of themed gardens, colorful seasonal displays, unusual trees, and a magnificent outdoor butterfly house that houses 300 butterflies.

As part of its 75th anniversary celebration, the garden is planning to create a M.S. Hershey Tribute Garden to showcase the revival of the special Hershey rose bush.

The new garden will feature a variety of trees and annuals. A special tribute to Hershey will feature a special circular seating area that will include 75 commemorative naming opportunities. A quote by Hershey also will feature prominently in the garden: “The more beautiful you can make the place look, the better life the people will have.”

The tribute garden will overlook the community that bears his name.

Hershey “dreamed of building a community where residents could enjoy a wonderful quality of life,” said anniversary co-chairwomen Trish Foulkrod and Ashie Santangelo.

“He valued horticultural beauty and made it a priority in his community. Attractive green lawns and manicured beds created a beautiful setting for his thriving town.

“Today, Mr. Hershey’s legacy of horticulture can still be found throughout our town.”

For more information on the 75 donor opportunities or the tribute garden, contact the Hershey Gardens membership office at 63 W. Chocolate Ave., Hershey or call 717-534-3492.

 

Details of all our roses are available on our web site. Over 1000 varieties to choose from.

www.countrygardenroses.co.uk

READ MORE >

 

Feb 14 • 2012 • BushesFlowersHybrid RosesNew Roses For 2012Princess Of Walesbloomsgardeners

ROSE NEWS FROM AROUND THE WORLD

USA

THE FUTURE DOES NOT LOOK ROSY

PRINCESS OF WALES

Future generations may never know the beauty of Diana, Princess of Wales; sniff Catalina in the sunshine; or fall for Beloved. For a century, devoted gardeners have appreciated the marvels of delicate and finicky hybrid roses and referred to them by name, like pets or family. The product of generations of breeding, the queen of flowers could act like a spoiled princess because its delicate blooms offered a special reward. In recent years, though, time-strapped homeowners have traded their big teas for compact shrub roses—utilitarian soldiers in the landscape that could cover ground without fuss. Our desire for the carefree—no-iron shirts, no-wax floors, and now low-maintenance yards—has brought the rose industry to a crossroads. “At some point, it becomes a self-fulfilling prophecy. (Landscape) roses will be all you have; the beautiful, unique hybrid teas will be gone,” said Charlie Anderson, president of Weeks Roses, the only major company still creating new varieties of full-size roses. The flagging economy has compounded the rose industry’s troubles. Two years ago, rose giant Jackson & Perkins, which had annually shipped 10 million bushes countrywide, filed for bankruptcy protection. Many of the hybrid roses the company created—such as Diana, Catalina and Beloved—may soon disappear from the mass market as the supply of those bushes dries up. “Roses are viewed as an extravagance and they’re still trying to shed that stigma,” said Seth Taylor of Capital Nursery. “People have a very specific thing in mind when they think of a rose—it’s full and lush and romantic. That’s your traditional rose, what people love,” Taylor said. “The single-petaled shrub roses are gaining a foothold with the public, but when my customers look at those flowers, they say ‘That’s not a rose.’ “ While gardeners may have visions of old-fashioned roses plucked from cottage gardens, their interest in growing them has waned, said Jolene Adams, incoming national president of the American Rose Society. “Many homeowners have had some experience—usually in their mother’s or grandmother’s gardens—so they’ll try growing roses,” she said. “But without sufficient knowledge (on how to care for them), the roses languish and do not grow to their full, beautiful potential. And they’re not replaced if they die.” Most of the United States’ rose bushes originate in California’s Central Valley. But unlike wheat or tomatoes, it takes several years to produce a single crop of rose bushes. Hybridizers typically will test 400,000 seedlings to find one or two new varieties. Once selected, a new hybrid will be developed for seven to 10 years before it’s released into the market. When ready for sale, field-grown bushes are 2 years old. Winter is prime rose-planting time. Valentine’s Day also spurs sales. But this month, local gardeners are finding limited selections at nurseries and home centers. “I observed dramatically fewer roses in the nurseries this year,” said T.J. David, co-founder of the World Peace Rose Garden in Sacramento’s Capitol Park. “The financial ills of the rose growers will cause a slowdown in the number of new varieties of roses that are available for sale,” he said. “Since growers make plans years in advance, it may take a year or two to see the full impact.” The annual wholesale value of California’s rose crop dropped 55 percent from a high of $61.05 million in 2003 to $27.20 million in 2010, according to nursery industry expert Hoy Carman, a retired University of California-Davis professor. “The whole nursery industry is down,” Carman said. “In 2008, sales just plummeted.” Said Adams of the Rose Society: “Roses are not the first thing homeowners think of when they want to plant a garden. Competition with other choice plants is fierce. ... The industry is going to have to change—and supply roses that the customers can use in the landscape.” Most major rose growers have gone bankrupt or consolidated with other wholesale nurseries. Weeks Roses, in Wasco near Bakersfield, Calif., survived its bankruptcy and is now owned by Indiana-based Gardens Alive. On 1,000 leased acres, Weeks will harvest about 3 million bushes this year. During grafting and harvest season, it employs almost 400 people. Jackson & Perkins, acquired by South Carolina-based J&P Park Acquisitions, no longer develops and grows new roses. Before bankruptcy, the company farmed 5,000 acres in Wasco with 20,000 bushes per acre. Without buyers, many of those bushes were burned. Once a breeder goes bankrupt, its roses usually disappear with it. Rose patents—good for 18 to 20 years—may be sold, but budwood and mother plants are lost. Many Jackson & Perkins roses are now on the endangered list. “Some will be preserved,” Anderson said. “But a lot of varieties were lost; there was no budwood to collect (to create new hybrid bushes). Most will just disappear into the ether.”

Details of all our roses are available on our web site. Over 1000 varieties to choose from.

www.countrygardenroses.co.uk

 

READ MORE >

 


New Roses
For 2021

Shop

Rose Care
Products

Shop

Our Simple Guide
to Rose Care

Read More